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Chapter 505-3 EDUCATOR PREPARATION RULES

Rule 505-3-.01 Requirements and Standards for Approving Educator Preparation Providers and Educator Preparation Programs

(1) Purpose. This rule states requirements and standards for the approval of educator preparation providers (EPPs) and programs for the initial and continuing preparation of educators in Georgia.
(2) Definitions.
(a) Accreditation: (1) A process for assessing and enhancing academic and educational quality through external, often voluntary, peer review. (2) A decision awarded and process certified by an accrediting organization. For the purposes of educator preparation provider (EPP) and program approval, GaPSC recognizes three (3) types of accreditation: Regional Accreditation, National Accreditation, and Specialized Accreditation. Each type of accreditation is defined in subsequent definitions.
(b) Advanced Preparation/Degree-Only Program: An educator preparation program at the post-baccalaureate level for the continuing education of educators who have previously completed initial preparation and are certified in the program's subject area or field of certification. Advanced preparation programs commonly award graduate credit and include master's, specialist, and doctoral degree programs.
(c) Approval: A process for assessing and enhancing academic and educational quality through peer review and annual reporting, to assure the public an EPP and/or program has met and continues to meet institutional, state, and national standards of educational quality; also, a Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) decision rendered when an EPP or program meets GaPSC standards and annual reporting requirements.
(d) Approval Review: Examination of evidence and interviews of stakeholders conducted by GaPSC site visitors and sometimes CAEP site visitors either on-site at an institution/agency, or electronically through the use of Internet and telephone conferencing systems as part of a Developmental, First Continuing, Continuing, Focused, or Probationary Review. Although not an approval review, the Substantive Change process is used when certain changes are made to the design or operations of approved program (see definition as).
(e) B/P-12: Formerly P-12, the term B/P-12 references schools serving children aged birth to grade 12.
(f) Branch Campus: A campus that is physically detached from the parent university or college and has autonomous governance. A branch campus generally has full student and administrative services with a CEO and is regionally accredited separately from the parent campus. For approval purposes, GaPSC considers branch campuses distinct from the parent institution and therefore a separate EPP. For approval purposes, a branch campus located in the state of Georgia having an original, or main, campus located in another state or country is considered an out-of-state institution and is therefore ineligible to seek GaPSC approval as an EPP.
(g) Candidates/Teacher Candidates: Individuals enrolled in programs for the initial or advanced preparation of educators, programs for the continuing professional development of educators, or programs for the preparation of other professional school personnel. Candidates are distinguished from students in B/P-12 schools. (The term enrolled is used in the GaPSC approval process to mean the candidate is admitted and taking classes.)
(h) Clinical Educators: All educator preparation provider (EPP) and P-12 school-based individuals, including classroom teachers, who assess, support, and develop a candidate's knowledge, skills, or professional dispositions at some stage in the clinical experiences. The term Clinical Educators is intended to be inclusive of the roles of Mentor Teacher, B/P-12 Supervisor, and Faculty Supervisor. EPPs are expected to clearly define the roles and responsibilities of all clinical educators with whom candidates interact.
(i) Clinical Practice: Culminating residency (formerly referred to as student teaching) or internship experiences with candidates placed in classrooms for at least one (1) full semester where they experience intensive and extensive practices in which they are fully immersed in the learning community and provided opportunities to develop and demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing. In initial preparation programs in Service and Leadership fields, candidates will complete such culminating residency or internship experiences in placements that allow the knowledge, skills, and dispositions included in the programs to be practiced and applied. In non-traditional preparation programs, such as GaTAPP, clinical practice is job-embedded as candidates must be hired as a classroom teacher to be admitted to the program.
(j) Content Knowledge: The central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of a discipline (Source: CAEP Glossary).
(k) Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP): The national accreditation organization formed as a result of the unification of the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC). CAEP advances excellence in educator preparation through evidence-based accreditation that assures quality and supports continuous improvement to strengthen B/P-12 student learning. CAEP accredits educator preparation providers (EPPs).
(l) Dyslexia and Other Related Disorders: Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin, which is characterized by difficulties with accurate or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede the growth of vocabulary and background knowledge. Other related disorders include aphasia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia.
1. Aphasia: Aphasia is a condition characterized by either partial or total loss of the ability to communicate verbally or through written words. A person with aphasia may have difficulty speaking, reading, writing, recognizing the names of objects, or understanding what other people have said. The condition may be temporary or permanent and shall not include speech problems caused by loss of muscle control.
2. Dyscalculia: Dyscalculia is the inability to understand the meaning of numbers, the basic operations of addition and subtraction, or the complex operations of multiplication and division or to apply math principles to solve practical or abstract problems.
3. Dysgraphia: Dysgraphia is difficulty in automatically remembering and mastering the sequence of muscle motor movements needed to accurately write letters or numbers.
(m) Dispositions: Moral commitments and professional attitudes, values, and beliefs that underlie educator performance and are demonstrated through both verbal and non-verbal behaviors as educators interact with students, families, colleagues, and communities.
(n) Distance Learning: A formal educational process in which instruction occurs when candidates and the instructor are not in the same place at the same time. Distance learning can occur through virtually any media including asynchronous or synchronous, electronic or printed communications.
(o) Distance Learning Program: A program delivered primarily (50% or more contact hours) through distance technology in which the instructor of record and candidates lack face-to-face contact and instruction is delivered asynchronously or synchronously (see definition n). These preparation programs include those offered by the EPP through a contract with an outside vendor or configured as a consortium with other EPPs, as well as those offered solely by the provider.
(p) Diverse: Showing a great deal of variety; very different, as in clinical placement (see definition q) (Source: CAEP Glossary).
(q) Diversity: Diversity is inclusive of individual differences and group differences. (1) Individual differences (e.g., personality, interests, learning modalities, and life experiences); and (2) group differences (e.g., race, ethnicity, ability, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, nationality, language, religion, political affiliation, and socio-economic background) (Source: CAEP Glossary).
(r) Educator Preparation Program: A planned sequence of courses and experiences for preparing B/P-12 teachers and other professional school personnel. The three (3) types of educator preparation programs are described in definitions ab (Initial), t (Endorsement), and b (Advanced).
(s) Educator Preparation Provider (EPP): The institution of higher education (IHE), college, school, department, agency, or other administrative body responsible for managing or coordinating all programs offered for the initial and continuing preparation of teachers and other school personnel, regardless of where these programs are administratively housed (formerly referred to as the professional education unit).
(t) Endorsement Program: A planned sequence of courses and experiences, typically three (3) to four (4) courses in length, designed to provide educators with an additional, specific set of knowledge and skills, or to expand and enhance existing knowledge and skills. Successful completion of an endorsement program results in the addition of the endorsement field to the Georgia educator certificate designating expertise in the field. Endorsement programs may be offered as non-credit bearing programs (or if applicable, as continuing education units), or they may lead to college credit; they must be approved by the GaPSC and administered by a GaPSC-approved EPP, and may be offered as either a stand-alone program or, unless otherwise specified in GaPSC Educator Preparation Rules 505-3-.82 through 505-3-.106, embedded in an initial preparation program. Depending on the needs of the individual educator, endorsement programs may also be included as a part of an educator's professional learning plan/goals. See GaPSC Rule 505-2-.14, ENDORSEMENTS.
(u) Field Experiences: Activities that include organized and sequenced engagement of candidates in settings providing opportunities to observe, practice, and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions delineated in institutional, state, and national standards. The experiences must be systematically designed and sequenced to increase the complexity and levels of engagement with which candidates apply, reflect upon, and expand their knowledge and skills. Since observation is a less rigorous method of learning, emphasis should be on field experience sequences requiring active professional practice or demonstration, and including substantive work with B/P-12 students and B/P-12 personnel as appropriate. In non-traditional preparation programs, such as GaTAPP, field experiences occur outside candidates' classrooms with students with diverse learning needs and varied backgrounds in at least two (2) settings during the clinical practice.
(v) First Continuing Review: Formerly called the Initial Performance Review, the First Continuing Review is conducted three (3) years after a Developmental Review to determine if the EPP and/or initial educator preparation program(s) have evidence of meeting all applicable standards. For EPPs seeking CAEP accreditation, the First Continuing Review of an EPP will be conducted jointly by state and national (CAEP) site visitors in accordance with Georgia's State Partnership Agreement with CAEP.
(w) Franchise Program: An endorsement program developed by and approved for a GaPSC-approved EPP (the franchise manager) and subsequently shared with other GaPSC-approved EPPs operating as franchisees.
(x) Georgia Teacher Academy for Preparation and Pedagogy (GaTAPP): Georgia's non-traditional preparation program for preparing career changers for certification as B/P-12 teachers. See GaPSC Rule 505-3-.05, GEORGIA TEACHER ACADEMY FOR PREPARATION AND PEDAGOGY (GaTAPP).
(y) Grade Point Average (GPA): A quantitative indicator of candidate achievement. Letter grades are converted to numbers and averaged over a period of time.
(z) Induction: (1) The formal act or process of placing an individual into a new job or position and providing appropriate support during the first three (3) years of employment. The Georgia Department of Education defines The Induction Phase Teacher as any teacher who has been hired into a new permanent position in any Georgia school. (2) A Georgia level of professional educator certification; for additional information see Rule 505-2-04, INDUCTION CERTIFICATE.
(aa) Information Literacy: An intellectual framework for understanding, finding, evaluating, and using information-activities which may be accomplished in part by fluency with information technology, in part by sound investigative methods, but most importantly, through critical discernment and reasoning (adopted from The Association of College and Research Libraries).
(ab) Initial Preparation Program: A program designed to prepare candidates for their first professional certificate in a teaching, leadership, or service field. Examples include degree programs at the baccalaureate, master's, or higher levels; or post-baccalaureate programs, non-degree certification-only programs, and non-traditional programs such as the GaTAPP program. Programs leading to an educator's first certificate in a particular field are considered initial preparation even if the educator is certified in one or more other fields.
(ac) Local Unit of Administration (LUA): A local education agency, including but not limited to public, waiver, Investing in Educational Excellence (IE2), charter schools and private schools (e.g., faith-based schools, early learning centers, hospitals, juvenile detention centers, etc.). As referenced in GaPSC Certification Rule 505-2-.01, paragraph (2) (d) 1, for employment purposes GaPSC Certification Division staff consider all non-IHEs as LUAs.
(ad) Media Literacy: The ability to encode and decode the symbols transmitted via media and the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate information in a variety of forms, including print and non-print messages. Also known as the skillful application of literacy skills to media and technology messages (adopted from the National Association for Media Literacy Education).
(ae) Mentor Teacher: A B/P-12 employed teacher and an expert practitioner who supports the development of a pre-service or novice teacher by assessing and providing feedback on instructional practice; interactions with students, colleagues, and parents; classroom management; and professionalism. Mentor teachers are typically involved with faculty supervisors in the formal supervision and evaluation of pre-service clinical practice experiences (residency/internship). The term Mentor Teacher is often used synonymously with the terms Cooperating Teacher and B/P-12 Supervisor. The terms B/P-12 Supervisor and Faculty Supervisor are described in definition as.
(af) National Accreditation: National accreditation is conducted by an accrediting organization which develops evaluation criteria and conducts peer evaluations to assess whether or not those criteria are met. National accrediting agencies operate throughout the country and review entire institutions. CAEP (see definition k) is an example of a national accrediting organization.
(ag) Nationally Recognized Program: A program that has met the standards of a national specialized professional association (SPA) that is a constituent member of CAEP. The term National Recognition signifies the highest level of SPA recognition awarded to programs.
(ah) Non-traditional Preparation Program (GaTAPP): A program designed to prepare individuals who at admission hold an appropriate degree with verified content knowledge through a major or its equivalent in the content field or a passing score on the state-approved content assessment in the content field. If the state-approved content knowledge was not required at admission, it must be passed for program completion. Non-traditional preparation programs do not lead to a degree or college credit and:
1. Feature a flexible timeframe for completion;
2. Are job-embedded, allowing candidates to complete requirements while employed by a regionally accredited local unit of administration (school district or private school), a charter school approved by the Georgia State Charter School Commission, or a charter school approved by the Georgia Department of Education as a classroom teacher full-time or part-time for at least a half day;
3. Require that candidates are supported by a Candidate Support Team;
4. Require an induction component that includes coaching and supervision;
5. Provide curriculum, performance-based instruction and assessment focused on the pedagogical knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for the candidate to teach his/her validated academic content knowledge; and
6. Are individualized based on the needs of each candidate with respect to content knowledge, pedagogical skills, learning modalities, learning styles, interests, and readiness to teach. See Rule 505-3-.05, GEORGIA TEACHER ACADEMY FOR PREPARATION AND PEDAGOGY (GaTAPP).
(ai) Out-of-State Institution: An institution of higher education administratively based in a state within the United States other than Georgia, or another country.
(aj) Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A core part of content knowledge for teaching that includes: core activities of teaching, such as determining what students know; choosing and managing representations of ideas; appraising, selecting and modifying textbooks; and deciding among alternative courses of action and analyzing the subject matter knowledge and insight entailed in these activities (Source: adapted from the CAEP Glossary).
(ak) Pedagogical Knowledge: The broad principles and strategies of classroom instruction, management, and organization that transcend subject matter knowledge (Source: CAEP Glossary).
(al) Pedagogical Skills: An educator's abilities or expertise to impart the specialized knowledge/content and skills of their subject area(s) (Source: CAEP Glossary).
(am) Preconditions: Fundamental requirements that undergird the GaPSC standards that must be met as a first step in the approval process and before an EPP is permitted to schedule a Developmental Approval Review.
(an) Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (PPEMs): A set of common measures applied to all teacher and leader preparation programs leading to initial certification in a field. Teacher Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (TPPEMs) and Leader Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (LPPEMs) are further defined in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.02, EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDER ANNUAL REPORTING AND EVALUATION.
(ao) Program Completer: A person who has met all the requirements of a GaPSC-approved or state-approved out-of-state educator preparation program.
(ap) Regional Accreditation: Regional accreditation is conducted by an accrediting organization that develops evaluation criteria and conducts peer evaluations to assess whether or not those criteria are met. Six (6) regional accreditors operate in the United States to conduct educational accreditation of public, private, for-profit, and not-for-profit schools, colleges, and universities in their regions.
(aq) Specialized Accreditation: Specialized accrediting organizations operate throughout the country to review programs and some single-purpose institutions. Like national and regional accreditors, specialized accreditation organizations develop evaluation criteria and conduct peer evaluations to assess whether or not those criteria are met.
(ar) Specialized Professional Association (SPA): A constituent member of CAEP representing a particular disciplinary area that develops standards for the approval of educator preparation programs in that area and reviews programs for compliance with those standards.
(as) Substantive Change Procedure: Process used for EPPs to submit changes that are considered significant, including additional levels of program offerings and changes to key assessments or leadership personnel.
(at) Supervisor: An individual involved in the oversight and evaluation of educator preparation candidates during field and clinical experiences. In most cases one or more individuals are involved in the formal supervision of clinical experiences-a supervisor employed by the EPP and one or more supervisors employed by the B/P-12 site hosting a pre-service educator. The term Faculty Supervisor refers to the employee of the EPP and the term B/P-12 Supervisor (sometimes referred to as Mentor Teacher or Cooperating Teacher) refers to the school-based employee who hosts a pre-service educator for the culminating residency or internship.
(au) Technology Literacy: Using technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate, and communicate information and understanding the ethical and legal issues surrounding the access and use of information.
(av) Traditional Preparation Program: A credit-bearing program designed for the preparation of educators typically offered by institutes of higher education.
(aw) Year-long Residency: An extended clinical practice lasting the entire length of the B/P-12 school year, in the same school, in which candidates have more time to practice teaching skills with students under the close guidance of experienced and effective B/P-12 teachers licensed in the content area the candidate is preparing to teach. Candidates fully participate in the school as a member of the faculty, including faculty meetings, parent conferences, and professional learning activities spanning, if feasible, the beginning (e.g. pre-planning) and ending (post-planning) of the academic year. (Candidates may participate in post-planning at the end of the junior year if it is not possible for them to participate at the end of the senior year). These extended residencies also include supervision and mentoring by a representative of the preparation program who, along with the B/P-12 supervisor, ensures the candidate is ready for program completion and is eligible for state certification.
(3) GENERAL REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO ALL EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(a) Authorization for the Establishment of Georgia Educator Preparation Providers (EPPs)
1. Regionally accredited institutions of higher education administratively based in the state of Georgia (as determined by the location of the office of the President or the single highest ranking executive officer of the institution), regionally accredited local units of administration with student enrollment over 30,000, Georgia Regional Educational Service Agencies (RESAs), and other education service organizations to include Georgia-based non-profit associations are eligible to seek GaPSC approval as an EPP for the purpose of preparing educators. Out-of-state institutions operating in the state of Georgia through a branch or satellite campus or by online delivery of programs, as well as for-profit organizations that are not regionally accredited institutions of higher education are not eligible to seek GaPSC approval as an EPP.
(b) Accreditation of Institutions/Agencies with an Educator Preparation Provider (EPP)
1. Institutions of higher education with a college, school, department or other entity that is a GaPSC-approved EPP shall be fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), at the level(s) of degree(s) granted by the institution. The institution shall submit program(s) for GaPSC approval corresponding to the appropriate level of accreditation and in a field recognized for certification by the GaPSC. If an institution has submitted an application for change in degree level to a GaPSC-accepted regional accreditation agency, and is seeking Developmental Approval of a program(s) at the proposed new degree level by the GaPSC, the institution must be regionally accredited at the new degree level prior to approval review by the GaPSC. See GaPSC 505-2-.31, GaPSC-ACCEPTED ACCREDITATION; VALIDATION OF NON-ACCREDITED DEGREES.
2. Local education agencies, RESAs, or other approved, non-IHE providers shall admit candidates who hold degrees from a GaPSC-accepted accredited institution of higher education appropriate for the certificate sought. GaPSC-approved EPPs offering Career Technical and Agricultural Education (CTAE) programs, including GaTAPP providers, may admit individuals who do not hold post-secondary degrees who are seeking CTAE certification in certain fields (see Rule 505-3-.05, GEORGIA TEACHER ACADEMY FOR PREPARATION AND PEDAGOGY). See Rule, 505-2-.31, GaPSC-ACCEPTED ACCREDITATION; VALIDATION OF NON-ACCREDITED DEGREESfor a list of acceptable accrediting agencies.
(c) GaPSC Approval of Educator Preparation Providers (EPPs)
1. An education institution or agency's EPP (e.g., college/school/department of education) and/or program(s) shall be approved by its governing board prior to seeking GaPSC approval for the first time (Developmental Approval). Once an EPP is approved, subsequent submission of programs for approval may be made as long as governing board approval is in process and completed 45 days prior to the GaPSC program approval review.
2. GaPSC approval standards for EPPs and programs shall at a minimum be adapted from the most recent version of the standards of the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).
3. CAEP accreditation of an EPP shall be accepted as a route to GaPSC approval of an EPP administratively based in the state of Georgia for which GaPSC has regulatory authority. Program approval is contingent upon EPP approval. If CAEP accreditation of the EPP is delayed, denied, or revoked, GaPSC will render a decision regarding EPP approval to offer educator preparation programs.
4. LUAs, qualifying organizations (see paragraph (3)(a)1.), and IHEs seeking GaPSC approval as an EPP shall follow all applicable GaPSC policies and procedures, e.g., preconditions to determine eligibility for a review, approval review requirements, post review requirements, Commission decisions, public disclosure policy, and annual reporting procedures. In order to maintain approval status, all GaPSC-approved EPPs must maintain regional or GaPSC-accepted accreditation and must comply with all applicable GaPSC rules and policies including, but not limited to, those regarding Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures, annual reporting, and data submission requirements. Failure by an approved provider to fully comply with GaPSC Educator Preparation, Certification, and Ethics Rules, Commission approval decisions, or agency procedures and/or requirements may result in changes in approval status that could include revocation of approval. Failure to comply with federal reporting requirements may result in fines.
5. The EPP must have completed the GaPSC approval process and be approved by the GaPSC before candidates are enrolled in educator preparation programs and begin taking classes.
6. For EPPs offering initial preparation programs leading to a Teaching, Leadership, or Service certificate, GaPSC EPP approval cycles shall include Developmental Approval valid for three (3) years and Continuing Approval valid for seven (7) years. The Developmental Approval Review is used to determine if a new EPP has the capacity to meet state standards and it is followed, in three (3) to four (4) years, by a First Continuing Review to determine if the EPP has evidence of meeting state standards. For IHEs seeking CAEP accreditation, the First Continuing Review will be conducted jointly by state and national (CAEP) site visitors in accordance with Georgia's State Partnership Agreement with CAEP. Following the First Continuing Review, the GaPSC will conduct Continuing Reviews of the EPP and all preparation programs at seven (7) year intervals. For IHEs seeking to maintain CAEP accreditation, the Continuing Review will be conducted jointly by state and national (CAEP) site visitors. GaPSC and/or CAEP will require a Focused Approval Review or a Probationary Review of an approved or accredited EPP and/or its educator preparation programs in fewer than seven (7) years if annual performance data indicate standards are not being met, or if a previous approval review indicates pervasive problems exist that limit provider capacity to offer programs capable of meeting standards and requirements specified in GaPSC educator preparation and certification rules, or if GaPSC staff determine non-compliance with state rules.
7. For EPPs offering only endorsement programs, GaPSC EPP approval cycles shall include Developmental Approval valid for seven (7) years and Continuing Approval every seven (7) years thereafter.
8. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall comply with all GaPSC reporting requirements, to include the submission of data in all appropriate candidate-level, program-level, and EPP-level reporting systems (e.g. Traditional Program Management System [TPMS], Non-Traditional Reporting System [NTRS], Provider Reporting System [PRS], and federal annual reports on the performance of the EPP and all educator preparation programs). Out-of-state EPPs offering initial teacher preparation programs to Georgia residents and/or to residents of other states who fulfill field and clinical experiences in Georgia B/P-12 schools shall comply with all applicable GaPSC reporting requirements, to include the submission of data in TPMS and other systems that may become applicable. EPPs shall report according to the schedules and timelines published by GaPSC and shall accurately provide all data elements. Failure to report on time and accurately may negatively impact EPP approval status. See GaPSC Rule 505-3-.02, EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDER ANNUAL REPORTING AND EVALUATION.
9. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall notify all enrolled candidates when EPP and/or program approval status changes. Notification must be made within sixty (60) days after a GaPSC decision is granted resulting in a change in approval status, in written form via letter or e-mail, and a copy must be provided to GaPSC by the EPP head. This notification must clearly outline the impact of the change in approval status on candidates and what options may be available to candidates. The EPP must maintain records of candidates' acknowledgement of receipt of the notification.
(d) GaPSC Approval of Educator Preparation Programs
1. Educator preparation programs leading to Georgia educator certification shall be offered only by GaPSC-approved EPPs (reference paragraph (c) 3). All initial preparation programs and endorsement programs must be approved by the GaPSC.
2. GaPSC-approved EPPs seeking approval to add new preparation programs may submit the programs for GaPSC approval prior to receiving governing board approval, as long as governing board approval is granted forty-five (45) days prior to the scheduled pre-visit, which occurs thirty (30) to forty-five (45) days prior to the approval review.
3. GaPSC-approved EPPs seeking approval for preparation programs leading to Georgia educator certification shall follow all applicable GaPSC program approval policies and procedures in effect at the time of the requested approval and shall comply with revised policies in accordance with timelines published by the GaPSC.
4. Initial educator preparation programs and endorsement programs shall be approved by the GaPSC before candidates are enrolled and begin program coursework.
5. GaPSC-approved EPPs, in conjunction with preparations for an EPP approval review, shall submit program reports conforming to GaPSC program standards and program review requirements for evaluation either by the appropriate CAEP-accepted national Specialized Professional Association (SPA) or accrediting agency, or by GaPSC. If the highest level of recognition, in most cases National Recognition or Accreditation, is granted for a program, state approval procedures will be reduced to remove duplication in processes and will include only those procedures necessary to ensure Georgia-specific standards and requirements are met. Programs submitted for national recognition that are not granted National Recognition (e.g., granted Recognition with Conditions or any level of recognition lower than National Recognition) must comply with all applicable GaPSC program approval review procedures.
6. GaPSC educator preparation program approval shall include a Developmental Approval Review to determine if the new educator preparation program has the capacity to meet state standards. For initial preparation programs in Teaching, Leadership, and Service fields, Developmental Approval is valid for three (3) to four (4) years and is followed by a First Continuing Review to determine if the educator preparation program has evidence of meeting state standards. Following the First Continuing Review, the GaPSC will conduct Continuing Reviews of the educator preparation programs in conjunction with the EPP Continuing Review at seven (7) year intervals. For endorsement programs, Developmental Approval is valid for seven (7) years and is followed by a Continuing Review every seven (7) years thereafter. The GaPSC will require a Focused Approval Review or a Probationary Review of an approved educator preparation program in fewer than seven (7) years if annual performance data indicate standards are not being met or if a previous approval review indicates pervasive problems exist, limiting program capacity to meet standards and requirements specified in GaPSC educator preparation and certification rules.
7. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall submit program(s) for GaPSC approval corresponding to the appropriate level of preparation (initial or endorsement) and in a certification field authorized in GaPSC Certification Rules. Although advanced/degree-only preparation programs are neither reviewed nor approved by GaPSC, those accepted by GaPSC for the purposes of certificate level upgrades must be listed in the GaPSC Certificate Upgrade Advisor.
8. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall make program decisions based upon program purpose, institutional mission, supply and demand data, and P-12 partner needs, and shall attempt to include a variety of options for program completion (e.g., multiple delivery models, degree options, and individualized programs; additional examples are provided in the guidance document accompanying this rule).
9. Ongoing GaPSC approval of educator preparation programs is contingent upon EPP approval status and shall be dependent upon the performance of the EPP and its programs. Upon the effective date of GaPSC Rule 505-3-.02, EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDER ANNUAL REPORTING AND EVALUATION, and full implementation of Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (PPEMs), PPEMs will be used as outlined in Rule 505-3-.02, as part of the approval process to determine ongoing approval of EPPs and educator preparation programs.
10. Out-of-state institutions offering initial teacher preparation programs to Georgia residents and/or to residents of other states who fulfill field and clinical experiences in Georgia B/P-12 schools shall ensure their candidates hold the Georgia Pre-Service Certificate prior to beginning any field and clinical experiences in any Georgia B/P-12 school required during program enrollment. The requirements for this certificate are outlined in GaPSC Rule 505-2-.03, PRE-SERVICE TEACHING CERTIFICATE. Out-of-state institutions preparing candidates for Georgia certification must also ensure their candidates meet all program completion assessment requirements outlined in this rule in paragraphs (3)(e)(5)(i) and (ii); the requirements specified in GaPSC Certification Rule 505-2-.22, CERTIFICATION BY STATE-APPROVED PROGRAM, paragraph (2) (d) 2.; and the requirements outlined in GaPSC Certification Rule 505-2-.04, INDUCTION CERTIFICATE, including the required amount of time spent in the culminating clinical experience (i.e., student teaching or internship occurring after, and not including, field experiences), and passing the ethics and content assessments.
11. Out-of-state institutions offering initial teacher preparation programs to Georgia residents and/or to residents of other states who fulfill field and clinical experiences in Georgia B/P-12 schools are subject to all applicable data collection requirements referenced in paragraph (c) 8. and described in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.02, EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDER ANNUAL REPORTING AND EVALUATION.
(e) Educator Preparation Program Requirements
1. Admission Requirements
(i) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure candidates enrolled in initial preparation programs at the baccalaureate level have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. EPPs offering non-traditional or traditional post-baccalaureate programs in teaching (T), service (S), or leadership (L) fields shall ensure enrolled candidates have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. There are no equivalent majors for the teaching fields of Elementary Education, Birth Through Kindergarten, or Special Education; therefore, candidates enrolling in these programs must have an overall GPA of 2.5. The provider shall ensure the average GPA of each enrolled cohort is 3.0 or higher. The term enrolled cohort refers to all candidates admitted to and enrolled in all initial preparation programs (across all T, S, and L fields as applicable) offered by the EPP in the GaPSC-defined reporting year (September 1 - August 31). EPPs may exempt individuals from the minimum GPA requirement under the following circumstances:
(I) if the prospective candidate's most recent undergraduate GPA was obtained ten (10) or more years prior to admission; or
(II) if the prospective candidates did not complete undergraduate coursework (applicable only to CTAE programs).

Exempted GPAs are not included in the calculation of the average for the admitted cohort. As long as the average GPA of the admitted cohort meets the 3.0 minimum requirement, EPPs may accept up to 10% of the admitted cohort with GPAs lower than 2.5.

(ii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure candidates admitted into initial preparation programs meet the GaPSC Program Admission Assessment requirement. A passing score on the Program Admission Assessment (formerly the Basic Skills Assessment) or a qualifying exemption is required prior to enrollment in all initial preparation programs, with three (3) exceptions:
(I) Military retirees or spouses of active-duty military personnel who do not exempt the requirement must attempt the Program Admission Assessment within the first year of program enrollment and must pass the assessment within two (2) years of program admission or prior to program completion, whichever occurs first (see GaPSC Rule 505-2-.46 MILITARY SUPPORT CERTIFICATE);
(II) Candidates seeking Career and Technical Specializations certification must either exempt the requirement or pass the Program Admission Assessment within three (3) years of program admission or prior to program completion, whichever occurs first; and
(III) Professionally certified educators (valid or expired) who enroll in initial preparation programs for the purpose of adding a new field of certification are not required to meet the Program Admission Assessment requirement.
(IV) Qualifying exemptions are available at http://www.gapsc.com/EducatorPreparation/Assessment/BasicSkillsInfo.aspx. See GaPSC Rule 505-2-.26, CERTIFICATION AND LICENSURE ASSESSMENTS for additional information related to program admission testing requirements and www.gapsc.com for Georgia educator assessment information, including qualifying exemption scores.
(iii) The Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment - Program Exit must be passed prior to enrollment in a traditional or non-traditional initial educator preparation program and to qualify for the Pre-Service Teaching Certificate (see GaPSC Rule 505-2-.03, PRE-SERVICE TEACHING CERTIFICATE).
2. Pre-service Certificate Request
(i) EPPs must request the Pre-Service Certificate for all candidates admitted to traditional initial teacher preparation programs at the baccalaureate level or higher, except for candidates who hold a valid professional Georgia teaching certificate and are currently employed in a Georgia school. Out-of-state EPPs must request the Pre-Service Certificate for candidates enrolled in initial teacher preparation programs and completing field and clinical experiences in Georgia schools; such candidates must be enrolled in programs leading to a certification field offered by the GaPSC. See GaPSC Rule 505-2-.03, PRE-SERVICE CERTIFICATE for Pre-Service certification requirements.
(ii) Successful completion of a criminal record check is required to earn the Pre-Service Certificate. The Pre-Service Certificate is required for all candidates enrolled in traditional initial teacher preparation programs and participating in field and clinical experiences in Georgia B/P-12 schools (see GaPSC Rule 505-2-.03, PRE-SERVICE TEACHING CERTIFICATE).
3. Program Content and Curriculum Requirements
(i) Preparation programs for educators prepared as teachers shall incorporate the latest version of the InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards developed by the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium. Preparation programs for educators prepared as leaders shall incorporate these standards into those courses related to instructional leadership to assure leadership candidates understand the InTASC standards as they apply to the preparation and continued growth and development of teachers.
(ii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require a major or equivalent in all secondary and P-12 fields, where appropriate. The equivalent of a major is defined for middle grades (4-8) as a minimum of fifteen (15) semester hours of coursework in the content field and for secondary (6-12) as a minimum of twenty-one (21) semester hours of coursework in the content field. Content field coursework must meet expected levels of depth and breadth in the content area (i.e., courses above the General Education level) and shall address the program content standards required for the field as delineated in GaPSC Educator Preparation Rules 505-3-.19 through 505-3-.53.
(iii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure candidates in all initial preparation programs complete a sequence of courses and/or experiences in professional studies that includes knowledge about and application of professional ethics and behavior appropriate for school and community, ethical decision-making skills, and specific knowledge about the Georgia Code of Ethics for Educators. Candidates are expected to demonstrate knowledge and dispositions reflective of professional ethics and the standards and requirements delineated in the Georgia Code of Ethics for Educators. In addition to candidates meeting the state-approved ethics assessment requirement in 505-3-.01,(e) 1. (iii) and (e) 5. (iv) (see GaPSC Rule 505-2-.26, CERTIFICATION AND LICENSURE ASSESSMENTS), GaPSC-approved EPPs shall assess candidates' knowledge of professional ethics and the Georgia Code of Ethics for Educators either separately or in conjunction with assessments of dispositions.
(iv) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure candidates are prepared to implement Georgia state mandated standards (i.e., Georgia Performance Standards [GPS]; Georgia Performance Standards [CCGPS], Georgia Standards of Excellence, College and Career Ready Standards, and all other GaDOE-approved standards) in each relevant content area. Within the context of core knowledge instruction, providers shall ensure candidates are prepared to develop and deliver instructional plans that incorporate critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills and opportunities for student collaboration. EPPs shall ensure candidates are also prepared to implement any Georgia mandated educator evaluation system. EPPs shall ensure educational leadership candidates understand all state standards and have the knowledge and skills necessary to lead successful implementation of standards in schools.
(v) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require candidates seeking teacher certification to demonstrate knowledge of the definitions and characteristics of dyslexia and other related disorders; competence in the use of evidence-based interventions, structured multisensory approaches to teaching language and reading skills, and accommodations for students displaying characteristics of dyslexia and/or other related disorders; and competence in the use of a response-to-intervention framework addressing reading, writing, mathematics, and behavior, including:
(I) Universal screening;
(II) Scientific, research-based interventions;
(III) Progress monitoring of the effectiveness of interventions on student performance;
(IV) Data-based decision making procedures related to determining intervention effectiveness on student performance and the need to continue, alter, or discontinue interventions or conduct further evaluation of student needs; and
(V) Application and implementation of response-to-intervention and dyslexia and other related disorders instructional practices in the classroom setting.
(vi) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require candidates seeking certification to demonstrate satisfactory proficiency in computer and other technology applications and skills, and satisfactory proficiency in integrating Information, Media and Technology Literacy into curricula and instruction, including incorporating B/P-12 student use of technology, and to use technology effectively to collect, manage, and analyze data for the purpose of improving teaching and learning. This requirement may be met through content embedded in courses and experiences throughout the preparation program and through demonstration of knowledge and skills during field and clinical experiences. At a minimum, candidates shall be exposed to the specialized knowledge and skills necessary for effective teaching in a distance learning environment.
(vii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require candidates seeking certification in a teaching field, educational leadership and/or the service fields of Media Specialist and School Counseling to complete either five (5) or more quarter hours or three (3) or more semester hours of coursework in the identification and education of children who have special educational needs or the equivalent through a Georgia-approved professional learning program. This requirement may be met in a separate course, or content may be embedded in courses and experiences throughout the preparation program (see Rule 505-2-.24, SPECIAL GEORGIA REQUIREMENTS). In addition, candidates in all fields must have a working knowledge of Georgia's framework for the identification of differentiated learning needs of students and how to implement multi-tiered structures of support addressing the range of learning needs.
(viii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure candidates being prepared to teach in the fields of Elementary Education, Middle Grades Education, and the special education fields of General Curriculum, Adapted Curriculum, and General Curriculum/Elementary Education (P-5) demonstrate competence in the knowledge of methods of teaching reading.
(ix) GaPSC-approved EPPs offering endorsement programs shall ensure the programs are designed to result in candidates' expanded knowledge and skills in creating challenging learning experiences, supporting learner ownership and responsibility for learning, and in strengthening analysis and reflection on the impact of planning to reach rigorous curriculum goals as specified in GaPSC Rules 505-3-.82-505-3-.111. Unless specified otherwise in GaPSC Rules 505-3-.82 through 505-3-.111, endorsement programs may be offered as a stand-alone program or embedded in initial preparation or degree-only programs. The GaPSC Continuing approval process for embedded endorsement programs will require EPPs to provide evidence of meeting a minimum of two (2) of the following three (3) options:
(I) Option 1: Additional Coursework. Endorsement programs are typically comprised of three (3) or four (4) courses (the equivalent of nine [9] or twelve [12] semester hours). Although some endorsement standards may be required in initial preparation programs (e.g., Reading Endorsement standards must be addressed in Elementary Education programs) and in such cases some overlap of coursework is expected, it may be necessary to add endorsement courses to a program of study to fully address the additional knowledge and skills delineated in endorsement standards.
(II) Option 2: Additional Field Experiences. Endorsement programs require candidates to demonstrate knowledge and skills in classroom settings via field experiences. Candidates completing an embedded endorsement program may be required to complete additional field experiences (above and beyond those required for the initial preparation program) specifically to address endorsement standards and requirements.
(III) Option 3: Additional Assessment(s). Candidates' demonstration of endorsement program knowledge and skills must be assessed by either initial preparation program assessments or via additional assessment instruments specifically designed to address endorsement program content.

See the guidelines accompanying this rule for further clarification of expectations for endorsement programs.

(x) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall provide information to each candidate on Georgia's tiered certification structure, professional learning requirements, and employment options.
4. Requirements for Partnerships, and Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
(i) Effective partnerships with B/P-12 schools and/or school districts are central to the preparation of educators. At a minimum, GaPSC-approved EPPs shall establish and maintain collaborative relationships with B/P-12 schools, which are formalized as partnerships and focused on continuous school improvement and student growth and learning through the preparation of candidates, support of induction phase educators, and professional development of B/P-20 educators. EPPs are encouraged to establish and sustain partnerships meeting higher levels of effectiveness, as described in the guidance document accompanying this rule.
(ii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require in all programs leading to initial certification in teaching, leadership, or service fields, and endorsement programs, field experiences that include organized and sequenced engagement of candidates in settings providing them with opportunities to observe, practice, and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions delineated in all applicable institutional, state, and national standards. The experiences must be systematically designed and sequenced to increase the complexity and levels of engagement with which candidates apply, reflect upon, and expand their knowledge and skills. Since observation is a less rigorous method of learning, emphasis should be on field experience sequences requiring active professional practice or demonstration and including substantive work with B/P-12 students or B/P-12 personnel as appropriate depending upon the preparation program. Field experience placements and sequencing will vary depending upon the program. In non-traditional preparation programs, such as GaTAPP, field experiences occur outside candidates' classrooms with students with diverse learning needs and varied backgrounds in at least two settings during the clinical practice. Refer to the guidance document accompanying this rule for additional information related to field experiences and clinical practice.
(iii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure candidates complete supervised field experiences consistent with the grade levels of certification sought. For Birth Through Kindergarten programs, field experiences are required at three (3) age levels: ages 0 to 2, ages 3 to 4, and kindergarten. For Elementary Education programs (P-5), field experiences are required in three (3) grade levels: PK-K, 1-3, and 4-5. For middle grades education programs, field experiences are required in two (2) grade levels: 4-5 and 6-8. Programs leading to P-12 certification shall require field experiences in four (4) grade levels: PK-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12; and secondary education programs (6-12) shall require field experiences in two (2) grade levels: 6-8 and 9-12.
(iv) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall offer clinical practice (residency/internships) in those fields for which the EPP has been approved by the GaPSC. Clinical practice for all fields must occur in regionally accredited schools, charter schools approved by the Georgia State Charter School Commission, charter schools approved by the Georgia Department of Education, or in international settings meeting accreditation criteria specified in GaPSC Rule 505-2-.31, GAPSC-ACCEPTED ACCREDITATION; VALIDATION OF NON-ACCREDITED DEGREES. Candidates in Birth Through Kindergarten programs may participate in residencies or internships in regionally accredited schools or in pre-schools accredited by USDOE- or CHEA-accepted accrediting agencies. Candidates of GaPSC-approved EPPs must meet all applicable Pre-Service Certificate requirements, regardless of clinical practice placement location. Clinical practice must be designed and implemented cooperatively with B/P-12 partners and candidates' experiences must allow them to demonstrate their developing effectiveness and positive impact on all students' learning and development. Although year-long residencies/internships as defined herein (see paragraph (2) (av)) are recognized as most effective, teacher candidates must spend a minimum of one (1) full semester or the equivalent in residencies or internships. GaPSC preparation program rules for service and leadership fields may require more than one (1) full semester of clinical practice; see GaPSC Rules 505-3-.63 through 505-3-.81.
(v) B/P-12 educators who supervise candidates (mentors, cooperating teachers, leadership coaches/mentors, service field supervisors) in residencies or internships at Georgia schools shall meet the following requirements:
(I) B/P-12 supervisors shall have a minimum of three (3) years of experience in a teaching, service, or leadership role; and
(II) If the residency or internship is completed at a Georgia school requiring GaPSC certification, the B/P-12 supervisor shall hold renewable Professional Level Certification in the content area of the certification sought by the candidate. In cases where a B/P-12 supervisor holding certification in the content area is not available, the candidate may be placed with a Professionally Certified educator in a related field of certification (related fields are defined in the guidance document accompanying this rule). For teaching field candidates who are employed as the full-time teacher of record while completing residency or internship in a school requiring GaPSC certification, the B/P-12 supervisor must hold Professional Certification.
(III) If the residency or internship is completed at a Georgia school that has the legal authority to waive certification, the B/P-12 supervisor must hold a Clearance Certificate.
(IV) The Partnership Agreement shall describe training, evaluation, and ongoing support for B/P-12 supervisors and shall clearly delineate qualifications and selection criteria mutually agreed upon by the EPP and B/P-12 partner. The Partnership Agreement shall also include a principal or employer attestation assuring educators selected for supervision of residencies/internships are the best qualified and have received an annual summative performance evaluation rating of proficient/satisfactory or higher for the most recent year of experience.
(V) Certificate IDs (to include Clearance Certificate IDs as applicable) of B/P-12 supervisors must be entered in TPMS or NTRS prior to the completion of the residency or internship.

It is the responsibility of GaPSC-approved EPPs and out-of-state EPPs who place candidates intending to seek Georgia certification in Georgia schools for field and clinical experiences to ensure these requirements are met.

5. Assessment Requirements
(i) State-approved Content Assessment.
(I) Eligibility: EPPs shall determine traditional program candidates' readiness for the state-approved content assessment and shall authorize candidates for testing only in their field(s) of initial preparation and only at the appropriate point in the preparation program.
(II) Attempts: GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require all enrolled candidates to attempt the state-approved content assessment (resulting in an official score on all parts of the assessment) within the content assessment window of time beginning on a date determined by the EPP after program admission and ending on August 31 in the year of program completion, and at least once prior to program completion. Candidates enrolled in a traditional (IHE-based), initial preparation program leading to Middle Grades certification must attempt the state-approved content assessment in each of the two (2) areas of concentration, as required for program completion and receive an official score on each assessment prior to program completion. For more information on Middle Grades areas of concentration, see GaPSC Rule 505-3-.19, MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION PROGRAM.
(III) Passing Score: A passing score on all applicable state-approved content assessments is not required for program completion, except in the GaTAPP program, which is a non-traditional, certification-only program (See GaPSC Rule 505-3-.05 ); however, a passing score is required for state certification. See GaPSC Rule 505-2-.26, CERTIFICATION AND LICENSURE ASSESSMENTS, and GaPSC Rule 505-2-.048, PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATE.
(ii) State-approved Performance-based Assessments.
(I) Eligibility: EPPs shall determine initial preparation program candidates' readiness for the state-approved performance-based assessments in state-approved Teacher Leadership programs and Educational Leadership Tier II programs and shall authorize candidates for testing only in their field(s) of preparation and only at the appropriate point in the preparation program.
(II) Attempts: GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require candidates enrolled in state-approved Educational Leadership Tier II preparation programs to attempt the state-approved performance-based assessment (resulting in an official score on all tasks within the assessment) prior to program completion.
(III) Passing Score: A passing score on all applicable state-approved performance-based assessments is not required for program completion; however, a passing score is required for state certification. See GaPSC Rule 505-2-.26, CERTIFICATION AND LICENSURE ASSESSMENTS, Rule 505-2-.153, EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, and 505-2-.149, TEACHER LEADERSHIP.
(iii) State-approved Educator Ethics Assessment.
(I) Program Admission:
A. Candidates who enroll in initial teacher preparation programs must pass the Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment - Program Exit prior to beginning program coursework. Educators who hold a valid Induction, Professional, Lead Professional, or Advanced Professional Certificate are not required to attempt and pass the assessment if they enroll in an initial preparation program for the purpose of adding a new teaching field.
B. Candidates who enroll in any GaPSC-approved Educational Leadership program must pass the Georgia Ethics for Educational Leadership Assessment - Program Exit prior to beginning program coursework.
6. Program Completion Requirements
(i) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall require candidates completing initial preparation programs to have a 2.5 or higher overall GPA on a 4.0 scale. Non-traditional (GaTAPP) program providers do not issue grades and therefore are not subject to this requirement; however, non-traditional EPPs must verify all program requirements are met as specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.05,GEORGIA TEACHER ACADEMY FOR PREPARATION AND PEDAGOGY.
(ii) GaPSC-approved EPPs may accept professional learning, prior coursework, or documented experience the EPP deems relevant to the program of study in lieu of requiring candidates to repeat the same or similar coursework for credit.
(iii) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall provide, at appropriate intervals, information to candidates about instructional policies and requirements needed for completing educator preparation programs, including all requirements necessary to meet each candidate's certification objective(s), the availability of EPP services such as tutoring services, social and psychological counseling, job placement and market needs based on supply and demand data.
(iv) GaPSC-approved EPPs shall provide performance data to candidates that they may use to inform their individual professional learning needs during induction.
(f) Verification of Program Completion and Reporting of Ethics Violations
1. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall designate an official who will provide evidence to the GaPSC that program completers have met the requirements of approved programs, including all applicable Special Georgia Requirements, and thereby qualify for state certification.
2. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall, through appropriate GaPSC reporting systems (i.e.,Traditional Program Management System [TPMS] or the Non-traditional Reporting System [NTRS]), notify the GaPSC of program completion or program withdrawal within sixty (60) days of the event. EPPs shall also submit, in a timely manner, any documentation required of them by the GaPSC Certification Division for program completers seeking GaPSC certification.
3. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall ensure program completers meet all requirements of the approved program in effect at the time the candidate was officially admitted to the program and any additional program requirements with effective dates after program admission, as described elsewhere in this rule.
4. Should program completers return to their GaPSC-approved EPP more than five (5) years after completion to request verification of program completion, providers shall require those individuals to meet current preparation requirements to assure up-to-date knowledge in the field of certification sought.
5. GaPSC-approved EPPs shall immediately report to GaPSC any violations of the Georgia Code of Ethics for Educators by enrolled candidates. Failure to report ethical violations may result in changes in approval status that could include revocation of approval. Out-of-state EPPs placing candidates in Georgia schools for field and clinical experiences are expected to collaborate with Georgia B/P-12 partners to immediately report ethics violations. Procedures for reporting ethical violations are addressed in the guidance document accompanying this rule.

Rule 505-3-.02 Educator Preparation Provider Annual Reporting and Evaluation

(1) PURPOSE. This rule states requirements for the annual evaluation of educator preparation programs and educator preparation providers, and requirements for annual reporting of program effectiveness by educator preparation providers that prepare individuals for certification as education personnel in Georgia.
(2) Definitions.
(a) Advanced Preparation/Degree-Only Program: An educator preparation program at the post-baccalaureate level for the continuing education of educators who have previously completed initial preparation. Advanced preparation/degree-only programs commonly award graduate credit and include masters, specialist, and doctoral degree programs.
(b) Approval: A process for assessing and enhancing academic and education quality through peer review, to assure the public that an educator preparation provider and/or educator preparation program has met institutional, state, and national standards of educational quality; also, a Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) decision rendered when an educator preparation provider or educator preparation program meets GaPSC standards and required annual reporting requirements.
(c) Approval Review: Examination of evidence and interviews of stakeholders conducted by the GaPSC Site Visitors either on-site at an institution/agency, or electronically using web and telephone conferencing systems as part of a developmental, first continuing, focused, or probationary review.
(d) Candidates/Teacher Candidates: Individuals enrolled in, programs for the initial or advanced preparation of educators, programs for the continuing professional development of educators, or programs for the preparation of other professional school personnel. Candidates are distinguished from students in P-12 schools. Candidates in programs leading to teacher certification may also be referred to as Pre-service Teacher Candidates.
(e) Certified/Classified Personnel Information (CPI): A tri-annual data collection performed by the Georgia Department of Education of active certified and classified employees at each school/district location. The data includes job assignment, subject matter, percentage of time assigned, local years of service, years of experience for payroll purposes, employment basis, and contract salary including all supplements for each certified employee.
(f) Clinical Practice: Residency (formerly referred to as student teaching) or internships that provide candidates with an intensive and extensive culminating activity. Candidates are immersed in the learning community and provided opportunities to develop and demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing.
(g) Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP): The national accreditation organization formed as a result of the unification of the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC). CAEP advances excellence in educator preparation through evidence-based accreditation that assures quality and supports continuous improvement to strengthen P-12 student learning.
(h) Educator Preparation Program: A planned sequence of courses and experiences for preparing P-12 teachers and other professional school personnel that leads to a state certification. See the definitions for the three (3) types of educator preparation programs: Initial, Endorsement, and Advanced/Degree-Only.
(i) Educator Preparation Provider (EPP): The institution of higher education (IHE), college, school, department, agency, or other administrative body with the responsibility for managing or coordinating all programs offered for the initial and continuing preparation of teachers and other school personnel, regardless of where these programs are administratively housed (formerly referred to as the professional education unit).
(j) Endorsement Program: A planned sequence of courses and experiences, typically no more than four (4) courses in length, designed to provide certified educators with an additional, specific set of knowledge and skills. Successful completion of an endorsement program results in the addition of the endorsement field to the Georgia educator certificate. Endorsement programs may lead to college credit and/or professional learning units, must be approved by the GaPSC, and may be offered by any GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider. See GaPSC Rule 505-2-.14, ENDORSEMENTS.
(k) Field Experiences: Field experiences are those activities that include organized and sequenced engagement of candidates in settings that provide opportunities to observe, practice, and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions delineated in institutional, state, and national standards. The experiences must be systematically designed and sequenced to increase the complexity and levels of engagement with which candidates apply, reflect upon, and expand their knowledge and skills. Since observation is a less rigorous method of learning, emphasis should be on field experience sequences that require active professional practice or demonstration, and that include substantive work with P-12 students and P-12 personnel as appropriate.
(l) Induction: Support received by novice teachers and new school leaders during their first three (3) years in their new position. The State Induction Guidance Documents provide a framework for how school districts and their partners will structure the induction system. The Induction level of Georgia's tiered certification system is designed to include support for novice teachers.
(m) Initial Preparation Program: A program designed to prepare candidates for their initial, or first, professional certificate in a teaching, leadership, or service field. Examples include degree programs at the baccalaureate, master's, or higher levels; or post-baccalaureate programs, non-degree certification-only programs, and non-traditional programs such as the Georgia Teacher Academy for Preparation and Pedagogy (GaTAPP) program. Programs leading to an educator's first certificate in a particular field are considered initial preparation even if the educator is certified in one or more other fields.
(n) Leader Assessment on Performance Standards (LAPS): A part of the Georgia statewide evaluation system for leaders, LAPS is a qualitative, rubrics-based evaluation method designed to measure leadership performance related to quality performance standards.
(o) Leadership Position / Leadership Role: A leadership position as determined by the Georgia Department of Education is one that requires the employee in that position to hold an Educational Leadership certificate and is one in which the employee has specified authority and supervisory responsibilities. In contrast to leadership positions, leadership roles are those job assignments that do not require a leadership certificate and in which the employee does not have specified authority or supervisory responsibilities.
(p) Leader Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (LPPEMs): A collection of common measures applied to all GaPSC-approved educational leadership preparation programs leading to initial certification in Georgia performance-based Educational Leadership.
(q) Non-traditional Preparation Program: A program designed to prepare individuals holding an appropriate degree for a professional certificate. Non-traditional preparation programs lead only to a certificate, not to a degree or college credit and:
1. Feature a flexible timeframe for completion;
2. Are job-embedded allowing candidates to complete requirements while employed by a regionally accredited local school system or regionally accredited private school as a classroom teacher full-time or part-time for at least a half day;
3. Require that candidates are supported by a Candidate Support Team;
4. Require an induction component that includes coaching and supervision;
5. Provide curriculum, performance-based instruction and assessment focused on the pedagogical knowledge and skills necessary for the candidate to teach his/her validated academic content knowledge; and
6. Are individualized based on the needs of each candidate with respect to content knowledge, pedagogical skills, learning modalities, learning styles, interests, and readiness to teach. Georgia's non-traditional preparation program for teachers is named Georgia Teacher Academy for Preparation and Pedagogy (GaTAPP). See GaPSC Rule 505-3-.05, GEORGIA TEACHER ACADEMY FOR PREPARATION AND PEDAGOGY (GaTAPP).
(r) Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (PPEMs): A collection of common measures applied to all teacher and leader preparation programs leading to initial certification in a field. Teacher Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (TPPEMs) and Leader Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (LPPEMs) are further defined in this rule.
(s) Out-of-State Institution: An institution of higher education that is administratively based in a state within the United States other than Georgia.
(t) Program Completer: A person who has met all the requirements of a GaPSC-approved or state-approved out-of-state educator preparation program, to include all GaPSC requirements such as attempting all assessments required for state certification.
(u) Program Performance Levels: Based upon preparation program effectiveness measures, the performance of educator preparation programs and EPPs will be classified annually as meeting the requirements of one of the following four (4) performance levels:
1. Level 4 - Exemplary;
2. Level 3 - Effective;
3. Level 2 - At-risk of Low Performing; or
4. Level 1 - Low Performing.
(v) State-approved Content Assessment: A content-specific, standardized test aligned with preparation program standards (state and national) and Georgia's P-12 curriculum, and developed to ensure that educators have the content knowledge necessary for successful performance as an educator. A passing score on the appropriate assessment is required for state certification.
(w) Teacher Assessment on Performance Standards (TAPS): A part of the Georgia statewide evaluation system for teachers, TAPS is a qualitative, rubrics-based evaluation method designed to measure teacher performance related to quality performance standards.
(x) Teacher Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (TPPEMs): A collection of common measures applied to all GaPSC-approved teacher preparation programs leading to initial certification in a teaching field.
(y) Tier I Educational Leadership Program: A traditional or non-traditional preparation program designed to prepare candidates for entry level leadership positions that include P-12 school level positions supervised by the principal and system level positions that do not supervise principals.
(z) Tier II Educational Leadership Program: A traditional or non-traditional preparation program designed to prepare candidates for advanced leadership positions that include P-12 school level principals or the equivalent, superintendents, or other LUA staff who supervise principals.
(aa) Traditional Preparation Program: A credit-bearing program designed for the preparation of educators offered by an institution of higher education.
(3) GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICABILITY.
(a) The requirements stated in this rule apply to all GaPSC-approved educator preparation providers (EPPs) and all educator preparation programs leading to initial certification in a teaching or leadership field.
(b) Data will be reported in the aggregate, so as not to identify individual program candidates. Personally identifiable information will not be reported by GaPSC.
(4) PREPARATION PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS MEASURES (PPEMs).
(a) Reporting Year
1. The GaPSC reporting year starts September 1 and ends August 31.
(b) Teacher Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (TPPEMs)
1. Teacher Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (TPPEMs) are comprised of a set of four (4) measures representing the performance of candidates while enrolled in the preparation program and their performance in the classroom after program completion when completers are employed in Georgia public schools or Georgia public charter schools and in their fields of preparation. TPPEMs are collected and reported annually. TPPEM measures include:
(I) Employer Perceptions of Preparation data are derived from the common, statewide survey conducted annually of employers of those program completers (referred to as inductees) employed in Georgia public or public charter schools. For each cohort, the survey will be administered one (1) time near the end of the first year of inductees' employment in the field of preparation.
(II) Inductee Perceptions of Preparation data are derived from the common, statewide survey, conducted annually of those program completers employed in Georgia public or public charter schools and in their fields of preparation. For each cohort, the survey will be administered one (1) time near the end of the first year of inductees' employment in the field of preparation.
(III) Teacher Observation Data serves as an indicator of program completer effectiveness in the classroom. Aggregated observation data are derived from the annual, summative ratings for completers generated by the administration of the Teacher Assessment on Performance Standards (TAPS) instrument.
(IV) Assessment of Content Knowledge (state-approved content assessment; Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators [GACE]).
A. Every candidate enrolled in a teacher preparation program for which there is a GACE content assessment must attempt the entire assessment (all tests within the assessment) within a window of time beginning at a point determined by the EPP and ending on August 31 in the reporting year of program completion, and at least once prior to program completion (an attempt results in an official score on all tests within the assessment). Candidates enrolled in non-traditional teacher preparation programs may be required to pass the appropriate GACE content assessment prior to program admission, depending upon the field of certification sought (see Rule 505-3-.05, GEORGIA TEACHER ACADEMY FOR PREPARATION AND PEDAGOGY).
B. For all teacher preparation programs, the best attempt for each program completer prior to or on August 31 in the reporting year of program completion will be used to calculate the aggregated content assessment measure for the program.
(c) Leader Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (LPPEMs)
1. Leader Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (LPPEMs) for Tier I programs are comprised of five (5) measures representing the performance of candidates while enrolled in the preparation program and performance in the field-after program completion when completers are employed in leadership positions in Georgia public schools or Georgia public charter schools. LPPEMs are collected and reported annually subject to data availability following an initial hold-harmless year. Tier I LPPEM measures include:
(i) Employer Perceptions of Preparation data are derived from the common, statewide survey conducted annually of employers of those program completers (referred to as inductees) employed in leadership positions in Georgia public or public charter schools. For each cohort, the survey will be administered one (1) time near the end of the first year of inductees' employment in leadership positions and will constitute 10% of the LPPEM for Tier I programs.
(ii) Completer Perceptions of Preparation data, representing 10% of the LPPEM, are derived from the common, statewide survey administered to candidates nearing completion of Tier I leadership preparation programs.
(iii) Inductee Perceptions of Preparation data, representing 10% of the LPPEM, are derived from the common, statewide survey conducted annually of those program completers employed in leadership positions in a Georgia public or public charter school. For each cohort, the survey will be administered one (1) time near the end of the first year of inductees' employment in leadership positions.
(iv) Leader Observation Data serves as an indicator of the on-the-job effectiveness of program completers employed in leadership positions. Aggregated observation data are derived from the annual, summative ratings for completers generated by the administration of the Leader Assessment on Performance Standards (LAPS) instrument and will constitute 35% of the LPPEM for Tier I programs.
(v) Assessment of Content Knowledge data, representing 35% of the Tier I LPPEM, are derived from the Tier I GACE Content Knowledge Assessment, which must be attempted by every candidate enrolled in a Tier I Educational Leadership preparation program at least once prior to program completion. The assessment must be attempted within a window of time beginning at a point determined by the EPP and ending on August 31 in the year of program completion (an attempt results in an official score on all tests within the assessment). The best attempt for each program completer prior to or on August 31 in the reporting year of program completion will be used to calculate the aggregated content assessment measure for the program.
2. Leader Preparation Program Effectiveness Measures (LPPEMs) for Tier II programs are comprised of five (5) measures representing the performance of candidates while enrolled in the preparation program and performance in the field-after program completion when completers are employed in leadership positions in Georgia public school or Georgia public charter schools. LPPEMs are collected and reported annually. Tier II LPPEM measures include:
(i) Employer Perceptions of Preparation data, representing 10% of the LPPEM for Tier II programs, are derived from the common, statewide survey conducted annually of employers of those completers (inductees) employed in leadership positions in Georgia public schools or public charter schools. For each cohort, the survey will be administered one (1) time near the end of the first year of inductees' employment in leadership positions.
(ii) Completer Perceptions of Preparation data, representing 10% of the LPPEM, are derived from the common, statewide survey administered to candidates nearing completion of preparation programs.
(iii) Inductee Perceptions of Preparation data, also representing 10% of the LPPEM for Tier II programs, are derived from the common, statewide survey conducted annually of those program completers employed in leadership positions in Georgia public schools or public charter schools. For each cohort, the survey will be administered one (1) time near the end of the first year of inductees' employment in leadership positions.
(iv) Leader Observation Data serves as an indicator of the on-the-job effectiveness of program completers employed in leadership positions and constitutes 35% of the LPPEM for Tier II programs. Aggregated observation data are derived from the annual, summative ratings for completers generated by the administration of the Leader Assessment on Performance Standards (LAPS) instrument.
(v) Performance-based Assessment of Leadership Skills data are derived from the administration of the Performance Assessment for School Leaders (PASL). The PASL must be attempted by every candidate enrolled in a Tier II Educational Leadership preparation program within a window of time beginning at a point determined by the EPP and ending on August 31 in the year of program completion and at least once prior to program completion (an attempt results in an official score on all tasks within the assessment). The best attempt for each program completer prior to or on August 31 in the reporting year of program completion will be used to calculate the aggregated content assessment measure for the program, which will constitute 35% of the LPPEM for Tier II programs.
(d) Refer to the PPEM Technical Specifications document for additional information on each measure, and the schedule of data collection and reporting.
(5) PROGRAM AND EPP PERFORMANCE LEVELS AND APPROVAL STATUS.
(a) Performance Levels
1. Based on PPEMs, teacher and leader preparation programs and EPPs will be annually designated as performing at one of four (4) levels: Level 4 - Exemplary, Level 3 - Effective, Level 2 - At-risk of Low Performing, or Level 1 - Low Performing.
(b) Approval Status
1. Program and EPP performance levels will impact approval status and approval review procedures during regularly scheduled approval reviews. Approval processes such as review type (on-site, electronic, or hybrid), review documentation required, the scope of the review, and the level of GaPSC technical assistance provided will be impacted by program and EPP performance levels.
2. Between regularly scheduled approval reviews, additional site visits or monitoring will be required as a result of program or EPP performance at the At-Risk of Low Performing level or the Low Performing level. Failure to improve program or EPP performance levels over a three-year period may result in a recommendation to the Commission for revocation of approval.
(6) ANNUAL REPORTING.
(a) State Reporting
1. All GaPSC-approved EPPs are required to regularly and accurately submit all required candidate-level data to the Traditional Program Management System (TPMS) or the Non-traditional Reporting System (NTRS) as appropriate for all programs offered.
2. Out-of-state EPPs with teacher candidates fulfilling field and clinical experiences in Georgia schools are required to regularly and accurately submit to TPMS all data specified by GaPSC staff in association with the issuance of the Pre-Service Certificate.
(b) Federal Reporting: Title II
1. All GaPSC-approved EPPs are required to submit annually the data required for federal Title II reporting. Failure to submit Title II data, accurately, completely, and by published deadlines may result in adverse changes in approval status, up to and including recommendation to the Commission of revocation of approval, and may result in fines.
(7) USES OF PPEMS AND ANNUAL REPORT DATA.
(a) Reporting to EPPs. When sufficient data are available, PPEMs will be provided annually to each GaPSC-approved EPP. All data will be aggregated at the program level; no individual level data will be provided. EPPs are expected to use PPEMs and other data to improve programs.
(b) Reporting to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. PPEMs will be provided annually to the 18-member standards commission; data will be aggregated at the program and EPP levels and no individual level data will be provided. Members of the Commission will use PPEMs to recognize exemplary performance or make approval status decisions that may include requirements for additional monitoring and reporting, interim approval reviews, probation, or revocation of approval.
(c) Reporting to Other State Agencies. PPEMs will be provided to other state agencies as appropriate for the purposes of monitoring program quality. Data will be aggregated at the program and EPP levels; no individual level data will be provided. The Georgia Professional Standards Commission is a participating agency in GAAWARDS, Georgia's Academic and Workforce Analysis and Research Data System, which is the state's Pre-K through workforce (P20W) longitudinal data system. Data of individual candidates is provided to GAAWARDS annually. All personally identifiable information is removed prior to being used for research purposes.
(d) Reporting to the Public. PPEMs will be provided to the public annually via the GaPSC website. Data will be aggregated at the program and EPP levels; no individual level data or aggregations of fewer than ten (10) individuals will be provided. Program and EPP performance level reporting will be updated annually.

Rule 505-3-.03 Reserved

Rule 505-3-.04 Reserved

Rule 505-3-.05 Georgia Teacher Academy for Preparation and Pedagogy (GaTAPP)

(1) Purpose. This rule states specific content standards and requirements for approving non-traditional preparation programs designed for the initial preparation of transition teachers and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS, Rule 505-3-.02, EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDER ANNUAL REPORTING AND EVALUATION, and Certification Rules 505-2-.01, GEORGIA EDUCATOR CERTIFICATION, 505-2-.08, PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATE and 505-2-.05, PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE. This rule also states specific content standards and requirements for approving non-traditional preparation programs that prepare professionally certified teachers to teach any subject in grades P-5. Field Specific requirements for the Elementary Education Certification-Only Program through GaTAPP (grades P-5) are described at www.gapsc.com FIELD SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS. This extension to the GaTAPP rule supplements the requirements in rule 505-3-.14, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (P-5) PROGRAM.
(2) Definitions.
(a) Academic Year (AY): Consists of two (2) full semesters, one (1) of which must include the beginning of a school year.
(b) Candidate Support Team (CST): A team of school-based leaders, mentors, Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) supervisors, and content specialists who monitor, assess, and coach candidates using performance assessment data to improve teaching performance in order to improve student learning.
(c) Coaching: Assisting candidates in transferring knowledge, skills, and understandings in the GaTAPP program into professional practice.
(d) Clinical Practice/Field Experiences:
1. Clinical Practice: Candidates are immersed in the learning community and provided opportunities to develop and demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing while supported by the Candidate Support Team. The job-embedded, hands-on experiences provide candidates with an intensive and extensive opportunity to be monitored, assessed, and coached. Performance assessment data from these experiences inform the Individualized Induction Plan/ Professional Learning Plan.
2. Field Experiences: Various early and ongoing field-based opportunities, in which candidates may observe, assist, tutor, instruct, and/or conduct research. Field experiences occur outside the candidate's classroom in settings such as schools, community centers, or homeless shelters.
(e) Dispositions: Moral commitments and professional attitudes, values, and beliefs that underlie educator performance and are demonstrated through both verbal and non-verbal behaviors as educators interact with students, families, colleagues, and communities.
(f) Elementary Education Certification-Only Program: A one (1) year supervised program administered through GaTAPP to prepare teachers with Professional teaching certification in any field issued by the GaPSC with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to teach all subjects in grades P-5. This program requires an induction component that includes coaching and elementary pedagogical and content instruction for one (1) full academic year. This program does not lead to a degree or college credit.
(g) Highly Qualified Status: Although no longer a federal mandate, candidates admitted into GaTAPP programs have a minimum of a bachelor's degree, Georgia Provisional teacher certification, and verified content knowledge in the subjects they teach. Candidates seeking certification in non-core academic teaching fields are not required to meet "highly qualified requirements" and must complete the program to receive an Induction or Professional certificate by the end of the Provisional certificate validity period.
(h) Individual Induction Plan (IIP): A dynamic plan of action to improve candidate performance collaboratively developed by the CST and the candidate based on performance assessment data. The IIP will be used by the mentor/supervisor to coach the candidate in the twenty-four (24) competencies and dispositions delineated in this rule (also known as a Professional Learning Plan).
(i) Induction: A period of time (frequently up to three (3) years) when educators are new to a teaching or leader position or new to the state, a school, or a school district. The State Induction Guidance Documents provide a framework for how school districts and their partners will structure a system of support for the novice teacher and new leader in their first years of service. In GaTAPP, Induction is the first three (3) years as a newly employed classroom teacher who must receive mentoring/ coaching from the Candidate Support Team throughout the induction period.
(j) Non-traditional Preparation: Post-baccalaureate programs designed for individuals who did not prepare as educators during their undergraduate studies. These preparation programs, designed to lead to an Educator Preparation Provider's recommendation for certification but not a degree, often accommodate the schedules of adults and recognize their earlier academic preparation and life experiences. In most instances, candidates are employed as educators while enrolled. An example is the Georgia Teacher Academy for Preparation and Pedagogy (GaTAPP) where employment is required for enrollment.
(k) Regionally Accredited: A process for assessing and enhancing academic and educational quality through voluntary peer review by a regionally accepted accrediting body to ensure the school district is meeting its standards of educational quality.
(l) Special Education Consultative Teacher: A Special Education teacher who works collaboratively with a content area teacher of record in all content and is not responsible for final scores for students. Candidates in the GaTAPP program are required to develop unit and/or lesson plans based on the Georgia state-approved P-12 performance standards in an academic content area(s) of concentration and to implement those plans in the classroom.
(m) Special Education Teacher of Record: A Special Education teacher who is responsible for the curriculum, instruction, assessment, and record maintenance for the P-12 learner in any of the five (5) academic content concentrations, regular or remedial.
(n) Transition teachers: Individuals who wish to transition into teaching from another career path, did not complete a teacher education program, and who have never held a professional teaching certificate in any state or country.
(3) General Requirements.
(a) Educator Preparation Provider Requirements.
1. Eligible Program Providers: GaTAPP programs may be proposed by any GaPSC-approved EPP that can verify, through the program approval process, the ability to provide non-traditional preparation that complies with the definition of GaTAPP and to provide programs that meet all requirements and standards delineated in this rule. GaPSC-approved EPPs at local education agencies shall offer GaTAPP only to those candidates employed by that school system.
2. GaTAPP programs shall prepare individuals with the appropriate degree for the certificate sought in a Professional Teaching field issued by the GaPSC. GaTAPP programs have the following characteristics:
(i) Feature a flexible timeframe of one (1) to three (3) years for completion based on individualized performance assessment data;
(ii) Do not lead to a degree or college credit;
(iii) Are job-embedded allowing candidates to complete non-traditional preparation path requirements while employed by a regionally accredited local unit of administration (school district or private school), a charter school approved by the Georgia State Charter School Commission, or a charter school approved by the Georgia Department of Education as a classroom teacher full-time or part-time for at least a half day;
(iv) Require that candidates are supported by a Candidate Support Team (CST);
(v) Require an induction component that includes coaching and induction for a minimum of one (1) academic year and continuing until completion of the program;
(vi) Provide curriculum, performance-based instruction, and assessment focused on the pedagogical knowledge and skills necessary for the candidate to teach his/her validated academic content knowledge;
(vii) Are individualized based on the needs of each candidate with respect to content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and readiness to teach; and
(viii) Use candidate and non-traditional preparation performance data to inform decision-making regarding continuous improvement of candidate performance, program effectiveness, and provider effectiveness in the non-traditional preparation path.
3. Eligible Certification Fields.
(i) Non-traditional preparation paths are available for all teaching fields. FIELD-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS for GaTAPP fields are found at www.gapsc.com; and
(ii) As the purpose of GaTAPP is to prepare classroom teachers, service, leadership, and endorsement certifications are not available through GaTAPP. See Rule 505-3-.76, ALTERNATIVE PREPARATION FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM for information on alternative certification in the field of Educational Leadership.
(4) Program Approval Requirements.
(a) Annual Reporting and Evaluation Requirements are described in Rule 505-3-.02, EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDER ANNUAL REPORTING AND EVALUATION.
(b) Program Admission Requirements.
1. Field-specific admission requirements are described at www.gapsc.com FIELD-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS.
2. All admitted candidates shall meet the following requirements:
(i) Hold a minimum of a bachelor's degree from a GaPSC accepted, accredited institution of higher education; See FIELD SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS at www.gapsc.com for the CTAE exception;
(ii) Have a passing score on the Program Admission Assessment (formerly the Basic Skills Assessment) or a qualifying exemption;
(iii) Have verification of passing the Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment - Program Exit;
(iv) Never held a professional teaching certificate in Georgia or any other state or any country; See FIELD SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS at www.gapsc.com for the Elementary Education Certification-Only Program exception;
(v) Hold a valid Georgia Provisional teaching certificate or Permit. Candidates accepted into the Elementary Education Certification-Only program must hold a valid Non-Renewable Professional Certificate in Elementary Education as requested by the employing LUA;
(vi) Employed by a regionally accredited local unit of administration (school district or private school), a charter school approved by the Georgia State Charter School Commission, or a charter school approved by the Georgia Department of Education as full-time teachers or as part-time teachers who teach at least a half day;
(vii) Provide evidence of subject matter competence in the subjects they teach;
(viii) Have a teaching assignment that is appropriate for the field listed on the Georgia teaching certificate; and
(ix) Upon admission, have an Individualized Induction Plan (IIP)/ Professional Learning Plan.
(c) Supervision of Candidate Performance: GaPSC approved EPPs shall provide supervision and assessment of the candidate's performance and coordinate results with observations and assessments by the other CST members.
(d) Assessment of Candidate Performance: GaPSC approved GaTAPP EPPs shall utilize common state-approved assessments and multiple program EPP specific assessments to make decisions regarding candidate program status.
(e) Candidate Support Team (CST): For a minimum of one (1) academic year and continuing throughout the program, all candidates must receive intensive support through a CST meeting the following requirements:
1. Team Composition: all CSTs must be comprised of:
(i) A school-based administrator;
(ii) A GaPSC certified school-based mentor or teaching coach;
(iii) A supervisor employed by the EPP; and
(iv) If not represented by one of the previously described team members, a content specialist who holds certification and expertise in the candidate's teaching field.
2. Team Member Criteria: CST members must hold valid teaching certificates at either the Professional, Lead Professional, or Advanced Professional level and must demonstrate effective teaching performance on the appropriate state or local evaluation system. Educators holding valid Life, Service, or Leadership certificates may serve on CSTs as long as a teaching field certificate is also held or was previously held.
3. Training: Coaches/Mentors and Supervisors of the CST shall be trained in the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that meet the standards and requirements delineated in GaPSC Educator Preparation Rule 505-3-.105, TEACHER SUPPORT AND COACHING ENDORSEMENT or 505-3-.85, COACHING ENDORSEMENT PROGRAM. School-based administrators receive an orientation regarding program expectations linking the leadership practices to the program.
(f) Serving Professionally Certified Educators: To receive approval to offer a non-traditional path for Professionally certified educators to earn certification in Elementary Education, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider must ensure candidates meet the field-specific content requirements in Rule 505-3-.14, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (P-5) PROGRAM. This extension of the initial teacher preparation program features a one-year (minimum) supervised program for completion based on individualized performance assessment data and does not lead to a degree or college credit.
(5) Candidate Performance Requirements.
(a) Prior to program completion and through the use of performance-based assessments, candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the following professional dispositions:
1. Dispositions:
(i) The candidate demonstrates an appreciation of the diversity of the students, the staff, and the community and capitalizes on the richness of that diversity;
(ii) Candidate/student interactions and student/student interactions are friendly, warm, caring, polite, respectful, and developmentally and culturally appropriate;
(iii) The candidate establishes a culture of learning where students are committed to the value of the subject, accept the candidate's high expectations, and take pride in quality work and conduct;
(iv) The candidate responds appropriately, respectfully, and successfully to student behavior;
(v) The candidate's directions, procedures, and oral and written language are communicated clearly and accurately;
(vi) The candidate demonstrates flexibility and responsiveness by adjusting lessons, responding to students, and being persistent;
(vii) The candidate maintains accurate, complete records of student assignments and learning and of non-instructional activities;
(viii) The candidate frequently and successfully provides instructional information and student progress information to parents and engages families in the school program;
(ix) The candidate is supportive of and cooperative with colleagues and volunteers and makes substantial contributions to school and district projects;
(x) The candidate actively seeks professional development to enhance content and pedagogical skills and actively assists other educators;
(xi) The candidate proactively serves all students, challenges negative attitudes, and takes a leadership role in high quality decision-making; and
(xii) The candidate understands and actively participates in the school's School Improvement process.
(b) Prior to program completion and through the use of performance-based assessments, candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the following professional competencies:
1. Competencies:
(i) Planning and Preparation
(I) The teacher demonstrates solid knowledge of content structure of the discipline, of connections and prerequisite relationships, of content-related pedagogy and of connections with technology;
(II) The teacher demonstrates a working knowledge of age-group characteristics, of different students' approaches to learning, of students' skills and knowledge levels and language proficiency, and of students' interests and cultural heritage, and knowledge of students' special needs;
(III) The teacher demonstrates an appreciation of the diversity of the students, the staff, and the community and capitalizes on the richness of that diversity;
(IV) The teacher selects instructional goals that are valuable, sequential, clear, aligned with state and national standards, suitable for diverse students, and balanced among types of learning;
(V) The teacher actively seeks and utilizes varied instructional materials and community resources, including technology, to extend content knowledge, pedagogy, and student learning;
(VI) The teacher's instructional plans are coherent and structured in that learning activities (learning units and lessons), resources, groupings, and time allocations are varied and suitable to the developmental level of the students, to individual students, and to the instructional goals; and
(VII) The teacher utilizes varied assessment methods, including those through technology, that are congruent with the instructional goals for student learning; students' understanding of the criteria and standards; and the teacher designs and utilizes formative results to plan for and differentiate instruction.
(ii) The Classroom Environment
(I) Teacher/student interactions and student/student interactions are friendly, warm, caring, polite, respectful, and developmentally and culturally appropriate;
(II) The teacher establishes a culture of learning where students are committed to the value of the subject, accept the teacher's high expectations, and take pride in quality work and conduct;
(III) The teacher effectively manages instructional groups, transitions, materials, supplies, non-instructional duties, and supervision of volunteers and paraprofessionals;
(IV) The teacher makes standards of conduct clear, is consistently alert to student behavior, and responds appropriately, respectfully, and successfully to student behavior; and
(V) The teacher arranges the classroom and organizes physical space and materials skillfully, resourcefully, and with safety and accessibility components in place.
(iii) Instruction
(I) The teacher's expectations for student learning and classroom procedures are clearly articulated in directions, and both oral language and written language are communicated clearly and accurately modeling standard grammar;
(II) The teacher's questions and discussion techniques are of high quality and engage all students;
(III) The teacher utilizes engaging and varied representations of content, instructional strategies, assessment techniques, activities, assignments, technology, grouping configurations, materials and resources, structure and pacing;
(IV) The teacher develops relevant assessment criteria, monitors student learning, and gives meaningful and timely feedback to students and teaches students to self-assess and monitor their own progress;
(V) The teacher demonstrates flexibility and responsiveness by adjusting lessons, responding to students' needs, and being persistent in searches for varied approaches for students who have difficulty learning; and
(VI) The teacher accurately assesses lessons' effectiveness and demonstrates an understanding of how to modify subsequent lessons.
(iv) Professional Responsibilities
(I) The teacher maintains accurate, complete records of student assignments and learning and of non-instructional activities;
(II) The teacher frequently and successfully provides instructional information and student progress information to parents and engages families in the instructional non-traditional preparation path;
(III) The teacher is supportive of and cooperative with colleagues, is involved in a culture of professional inquiry, and makes substantial contributions to school and district projects;
(IV) The teacher actively seeks professional development to enhance content, pedagogical skills and dispositions, accepts feedback from colleagues, and actively assists other educators;
(V) The teacher demonstrates integrity and ethical conduct; and
(VI) The teacher proactively serves all students, challenges negative attitudes, takes a leadership role in high quality decision-making, and understands and actively participates in the school's School Improvement process.
(c) The GaPSC-approved provider shall assure that all non-traditional preparation path participants meet the twenty-four (24) competencies at the proficient level by path completion, by providing preparation (curriculum, instruction, and assessment) in the following pedagogical content standards:
1. Essential Preparation
(i) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions in unpacking state and/or national standards for the purpose of teaching all students in the content field in which the candidate is seeking Professional Certification;
(ii) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary in developing pre- and post- assessments that are aligned with state and/or national content standards that clearly demonstrate the students' knowledge and skills as delineated in the state and/or national standards requirements; and
(iii) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to establish benchmarks for monitoring student progress toward meeting state/national content standards.
2. Evidence
(i) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions in planning, implementing, and using multiple assessments to determine the level of student learning based on the academic content standards of the teaching field to include the:
(I) Development of various types of assessments;
(II) Development of scoring guides for the assessments;
(III) Analysis of student work to assess achievement and gains; and
(IV) Analysis of assessment data to determine instruction to meet individual student needs.
3. Engagement
(i) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions of planning, implementing, and assessing classroom instruction engaging all students in active learning to include the:
(I) Establishment of a standards-based classroom;
(II) Use of research based exemplary practices;
(III) Use of activating strategies;
(IV) Use of cognitive strategies;
(V) Use of summarizing strategies;
(VI) Use of questioning strategies;
(VII) Use of Bloom's Taxonomy;
(VIII) Use of cooperative learning strategies;
(IX) Demonstration of the understanding of relationship between engagement and achievement;
(X) Demonstration of the understanding of how to align research-based strategies with Georgia Standards of Excellence;
(XI) Demonstration of the understanding of the role of effective questioning and critical thinking;
(XII) Demonstration of the skills to create acquisition and extending/refining lessons based on research-based strategies;
(XIII) Demonstration of the understanding of how to use strategies and graphic organizers to increase engagement;
(XIV) Demonstration of the understanding of how to write content questions according to Bloom's Taxonomy; and
(XV) Demonstration of the understanding of how to differentiate instruction by content and by learner.
4. Environment
(i) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions to develop and implement effective classroom management plans that include the:
(I) Appropriate arrangement of classroom that supports student learning;

and

(II) Planning and implementation of strategies that produce a learning environment that provides the best opportunity for student learning.
5. Ethics
(i) The non-traditional preparation path shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to model ethical practices of the education profession. ( 505-6-.01, THE CODE OF ETHICS FOR EDUCATORS)
(d) Program Completion Requirements. Non-traditional EPPs shall require candidates to:
1. Obtain a passing score on the state-approved content assessment in the field of certification sought, unless a passing score is required for program admission in that field (see www.gapsc.com FIELD-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS);
2. Meet the twelve (12) dispositions, twenty-four (24) competencies, and pedagogical content standards delineated in this rule;
3. Complete an Individual Induction Plan (IIP)/Professional Learning Plan that includes the requirements described in paragraph (2)(h);
4. Meet all of the elements in Standard 6: Requirements and Standards of the Georgia Standards for the Approval of Educator Preparation Providers and Educator Preparation Programs (Georgia Standards); and
5. Meet individual requirements resulting from the analysis of candidate assessment data.
(6) Field-Specific Requirements. To receive approval to offer non-traditional paths to Professional teacher certification in eligible fields, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider must ensure candidates meet all FIELD-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS found at www.gapsc.com.
(7) Field-Specific Exemptions for the Elementary Education Certification-Only Program Through GaTAPP. Since candidates in this program have completed an initial teacher preparation program, they are exempt from the Program Admission Assessment and the Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment.
(8) Military Exemption for Assessment Requirements. Military retirees or spouses of active-duty military personnel who do not exempt the Program Admissions requirement must attempt the Program Admission Assessment within the first year of program enrollment and must pass the assessment prior to program completion. Military retirees or spouses of active-duty military personnel who enter a GaTAPP program without a related degree in the field of certification sought must attempt the content assessment by the end of the first semester in the program and must pass the assessment by the end of the first year.

Rule 505-3-.06 Pedagogy-Only Program

(1) Purpose. This rule specifies the pedagogical standards required for approval of initial educator preparation programs offered at the post-baccalaureate level that prepare individuals to teach in Middle Grades (4-8), Secondary (6-12), and all P-12 fields except Special Education, for which they have demonstrated content expertise. This rule supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS; therefore, unless otherwise stated herein, all requirements specified for initial teacher preparation programs in Rule 505-3-.01 apply to pedagogy-only programs.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, syllabi, and key assessments addressing the Model Core Teaching Standards, listed below, published in 2011 by the Council for Chief State School Officer's Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC).
1. Learner Development: The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
2. Learning Differences: The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
3. Learning Environments: The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
4. Content Knowledge: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
5. Application of Content: The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
6. Assessment: The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher's and learner's decision making.
7. Planning for Instruction: The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
8. Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
9. Professional Learning and Ethical Practice: The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
10. Leadership and Collaboration: The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.
(b) Program Admission Requirements
1. In addition to meeting all program admission requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01, candidates must meet prior to enrollment the following requirements:
(i) Candidates must hold a minimum of a bachelor's degree from a GaPSC-accepted, accredited institution of higher education; and
(ii) Candidates must provide evidence of expertise in the content of the field of certification sought. This can be accomplished through one of three options:
(I) A major in the field of certification sought earned in conjunction with a bachelor's or higher degree from a GaPSC-accepted, accredited institution of higher education, or
(II) A passing score on the Georgia state-approved content assessment in the field of certification sought, or
(III) Evidence of successful completion of a specified number of semester hours of content area coursework earned in conjunction with a bachelor's or higher degree from a GaPSC-accepted, accredited institution of higher education. The number of semester hours of content area coursework required for secondary (6-12) and P-12 fields (excluding Special Education) is twenty-one (21) semester hours; and for Middle Grades (4-8) fields, fifteen (15) semester hours of coursework is required in one of the content areas of Language Arts, Math, Reading, Science, or Social studies.
(c) Program Completion Requirements
1. Prior to completion, candidates must meet all program completion requirements specified in Educator Preparation Rule 505-3-.01, with one exception; candidates seeking Middle Grades certification through the pedagogy-only program are required to be prepared in and attempt the state-approved content assessment in only one field.

Rule 505-3-.07 Paraprofessional Preparation Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare paraprofessionals for grades P-12.
(2) Requirements.
(a) The program shall require completion of either a minimum of two years (60 semester hours) of study at a GaPSC-approved accredited institution of higher education, an associate's degree or higher from a GaPSC-approved accredited institution of higher education, or successful completion of the GACE paraprofessional assessment; and
(b) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation providershall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:

Category 1 - Instruction

1. Instructional Support. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Develop or modify learning activities under direction of a teacher/provider;
(ii) Have a basic knowledge of how students learn and develop and are able to assist in providing opportunities that support students' intellectual, social, and personal development;
(iii) Use a variety of communication techniques, including verbal, nonverbal, and media within and beyond the classroom; and
(iv) Support the teacher/provider in evaluating the intellectual, social, and physical development of students.
2. Student Assessment. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Assist with student assessment, grade work and objective tests, and collect and maintain data on student progress;
(ii) Maintain confidential documents and student records;
(iii) Manage test sites, including distribution, collection, and tracking of test materials;
(iv) Administer and score teacher-prepared objective tests; and
(v) Assist with standardized testing within boundaries established by state and local rules and testing protocols.
3. Curriculum Development and Implementation. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Know patterns of human development and milestones typically achieved at different ages;
(ii) Have a basic knowledge of the discipline(s) taught and support the teacher/provider in creating learning experiences that make the subject matter meaningful for students; and
(iii) Know that students differ in their approaches to learning and assist in creating instructional opportunities that are adapted to students with diverse needs.
4. Technology. The program shall prepare paraprofessional who:
(i) Support the teacher/provider by sending and responding to e-mails; and
(ii) Use appropriate technology to support teaching and learning.

Category 2 - Classroom Management

5. Classroom Planning and Administration. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Support the delivery of instruction by maintaining accurate records, preparing attendance and lunch reports, sorting and filing student papers, maintaining an inventory of classroom supplies and materials, and creating attractive and instructionally relevant classroom displays;
(ii) Coordinate the use of instructional technology by students; and
(iii) Implement a variety of instructional strategies to assist the teacher/provider.
6. Management of Student Behavior. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Understand the impact of the educational environment on student learning, self-motivation, and positive social interaction, and assist in creating a positive learning environment; and
(ii) Implement appropriate rules and procedural safeguards regarding the management of behaviors of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

Category 3 - Professionalism

6. Safe Learning Environment. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Provide positive behavioral support and management;
(ii) Know and apply ethical and professional standards of conduct, including specific knowledge about the Georgia Code of Ethics for Educators and the requirements of confidentiality; and
(iii) Know and observe health, safety, and emergency procedures of the agency where employed, including those for documenting and reporting suspected abuse and neglect.
7. Parent/Community Responsibility. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Demonstrate awareness of the diversity among children, youth, families, and colleagues with who they work; and
(ii) Interact in a professional, effective manner with colleagues, parents, and other members of the community to support students' learning and well-being.
8. Professional Development. The program shall prepare paraprofessionals who:
(i) Understand the roles and responsibilities of certificated/licensed staff and paraprofessionals;
(ii) Engage in continuous professional improvement towards identified goals; and
(iii) Implement instructional and other direct services to all children and youth with disabilities in accordance with IEP requirements and IDEA and ESEA legislation.

Rule 505-3-.08 Innovative and Experimental Programs

(1) Purpose. This rule states standards for approving innovative and experimental programs and supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS. The Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) encourages innovation and experimentation in educator preparation. The standards and recommendations contained in this rule have been prepared to facilitate the development of alternative approaches to the preparation of education personnel. Nothing in this rule shall prohibit regional and local units of administration from developing these programs in collaboration with institutions of higher education.
(a) Innovative and/or experimental programs may be proposed by any GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider.
(b) Innovative and experimental programs are defined as those programs, which are designed to:
1. Develop new approaches, new arrangements, and/or new contexts for the preparation of school personnel;
2. Prepare school personnel for new types of positions emerging in the educational community;
3. Prepare non-traditional populations of candidates for educational roles;
4. Meet the special needs of particular segments of our society, and/or
5. Address special curricular areas for which there are no standards.
(2) Requirements.
(a) The program shall include a written statement of the rationale and goals of the proposed program describing a conceptual framework based upon professional needs, trends, and research about effective practice;
(b) The program shall include competencies based upon program objectives, which reflect attitudes, knowledge, and skills required of beginning practitioners;
(c) The program shall include a curriculum plan for achieving program objectives, evaluating the program and assessing students upon completion of the program;
(d) The program shall be supported by the institution/agency with budgetary and personnel allocations sufficient to sustain innovation and/or experimentation;
(e) The program shall include appropriate human, physical, and financial resources to assure the achievement of program objectives, including the planning and evaluation process;
(f) The program shall have written and published criteria and procedures for admission, retention, and completion;
(g) The program shall provide for the periodic evaluation of completers as a basis for program continuance;
(h) The program shall be vested in the preparing institutions and/or agencies and shall include evidence of administrative responsibility for governance and coordination; and
(i) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.09 Requirements and Standards for Training Pre-Candidates, Candidates and Facilitators in Georgia's National Board Certified Teachers Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states specific standards for approving training activities for Georgia's National Board Certified Teachers Program's Pre-Candidates, Candidates, and Facilitators.
(2) Requirements.
(a) An educator preparation provider (EPP) providing training for college or professional learning credit shall meet GaPSC rules for EPP and educator preparation program approval.
(b) The sponsoring agency described in program planning forms, brochures, and syllabi shall address the following standards:
1. The program shall demonstrate competencies in the application of current research and successful practices concerning teaching and learning;
2. The program shall demonstrate competencies in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for accomplished teaching;
3. The program shall demonstrate competencies in reflective teaching and writing, observation and feedback techniques, evaluation techniques and instruments and student-teacher conferencing skills;
4. The program shall demonstrate competence in the use of technology and shall include the application of computer hardware and software and in use of videotaping for self-reflection and analysis;
5. The program shall demonstrate competency in the use of artifacts to document professional contributions, involvement with parents, and activities within the community;
6. The program shall demonstrate effective analysis of pre-candidates' written assignments necessary for successful completion of the twenty (20) contact hours Pre-Candidate course required as a pre-requisite to receipt of state or state-managed funding for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards process and in the thirty (30) hour-recommended extension of the Pre-Candidate course;
7. The program shall demonstrate competencies in the use of questioning, mentoring and peer coaching in the Candidate support course, and in the Facilitator training course; and
8. The program shall demonstrate competencies in meeting and exceeding the propositions, standards, and ethical principals established by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

Rule 505-3-.10 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.11 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.12 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.13 Birth Through Kindergarten Program

(1) PURPOSE. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to work with and teach children with diverse learning needs from birth through kindergarten and supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer an educator preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards and requirements delineated below for initial early childhood professional preparation programs. The standards are adapted from standards published in 2019 by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the standards published in 2017 by the Council for Exceptional Children-Initial Specialty Set in Early Childhood.
1. Child Development and Learning in Context and Individual Learning Differences: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates are grounded in an understanding of the developmental period of early childhood from birth through kindergarten across developmental domains. They understand each child as an individual with unique developmental variations. They understand that all children develop within relationships; that learning is constructed by adults and children together; and that learning occurs within the context of families, cultures, languages, communities, and society. Candidates use this multidimensional knowledge to make evidence-based decisions to carry out their responsibilities. They understand how exceptionalities may interact with development and learning, and use this knowledge to provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for children with diverse learning needs. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates know and understand early childhood development based on:
(I) Knowledge of developmental theories, coursework, and observation across domains and areas such as physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and linguistic; and
(II) Understanding variability in early development of young children with diverse learning needs, such as children with disabilities or children who are bilingual, and the impacts of variability on development and learning.
(ii) Candidates know and understand the biological and environmental factors, both social and physical, that affect pre-, peri-, and postnatal development and learning.
(iii) Candidates know, understand, and value each child as an individual with unique developmental variations, agencies, strengths, interests, challenges, approaches to learning, experiences and abilities.
(iv) Candidates know and understand the impact of medical conditions and related care on development and learning, as well as on family concerns, resources, and priorities.
(v) Candidates know and understand the ways that development and the learning process for children with diverse learning needs occur within multiple contexts, including family, culture, language, and community as well as within a larger societal context of structural inequities.
(vi) Candidates use multidimensional knowledge of early development (including developmental period of early childhood; etiology, characteristics, and classification of common disabilities in infants and young children; and individual child, development and learning in cultural context) to make evidence-based decisions that support each child.
2. Family and Community Partnerships: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates understand that successful early childhood education depends upon partnerships with young children's families. They know about, understand, and value the importance of and diversity in family and community characteristics. They use this understanding to create respectful, culturally and linguistically responsive, reciprocal relationships and to engage as partners with families in young children's development and learning. They use community resources to support young children's learning and development and to support families as they also support partnerships with early learning settings, schools and community organizations and agencies. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates know about, understand, and value the diversity of families and communities.
(ii) Candidates engage as partners with families in young children's development, and learn through respectful and reciprocal relationships.
(iii) Candidates use community resources to support families and young children, as well as work to support the community.
3. Child Observation, Documentation, and Assessment: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates understand that the primary purpose of assessment (formal and informal, formative and summative) is to inform instruction and planning for children with diverse learning needs in early learning settings. They understand that child observation, documentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood professionals. They know how to use observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment approaches and technically sound tools that minimize bias, and use knowledge of measurement principles and practices to interpret assessment results and guide educational decisions for individuals with diverse learning needs. They are responsible and ethical in their use of assessment and assessment results. In partnership with families and professional colleagues, they document individual children's progress, and plan learning experiences that promote positive outcomes for each child. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates understand that assessment (formal and informal, formative and summative) is conducted to make informed choices and for planning in early learning settings.
(ii) Candidates know a wide range of types of assessments, their purposes, and their associated methods and tools.
(iii) Candidates align assessment with curriculum; content standards; and local, state, and federal regulations.
(iv) Candidates practice assessment that is ethically and legally grounded and developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate to document developmental progress and promote positive outcomes for each child.
(v) Candidates build assessment partnerships with families and professional colleagues, including, assisting families in identifying their concerns, resources, and priorities, and integrating family priorities and concerns in the assessment process.
(vi) Candidates assess progress in the five developmental domains, play, and temperament using a variety of materials and contexts to maintain the interests of young children and the assessment process.
(vii) Candidates emphasize the child's strengths and needs in assessment reports that focus on functional concerns, and participate as a team member to integrate assessment results in the development and implementation of individualized plans.
4. Learning Environments: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments, so that children with diverse learning needs become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination. They collaborate with other colleagues to create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage all children in meaningful learning activities and social interactions. Birth Through Kindergarten candidates use motivational and instructional interventions to teach children with diverse learning needs how to adapt to different environments. They know how to intervene safely and appropriately with all children. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates select, develop, and evaluate developmentally and functionally appropriate materials, equipment, and environments.
(ii) Candidates organize space, time, materials, peers, and adults to maximize progress in natural and structured environments.
(iii) Candidates embed learning opportunities in everyday routines, relationships, activities, and places.
(iv) Candidates structure social environments, using peer models and proximity, and responsive adults, to promote interactions among peers, parents, and caregivers.
(v) Candidates provide a stimulus-rich indoor and outdoor environment that employs materials, media, and adaptive and assistive technology responsive to individual differences.
(vi) Candidates implement basic health, nutrition, and safety management procedures for infants and young children.
(vii) Candidates use evaluation procedures and recommend referral with ongoing follow-up to community health and social services.
5. Developmentally, Culturally, and Linguistically Appropriate Teaching Strategies: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates understand that teaching and learning with young children is a complex enterprise, and its details vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the settings within which teaching and learning occur. They understand and use positive, caring, supportive relationships and interactions as the foundation for their work with young children. They are able to differentiate instruction for individual children and for groups. They use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate, culturally and linguistically relevant, and evidence-based teaching approaches that reflect universal design for learning principles. They understand the importance of play and inquiry in young children's learning and development, and how to support play in early education. They develop and sustain reflective, responsive and intentional practice. They use technologies to support instructional assessment, planning, and delivery for children with diverse learning needs, and are familiar with augmentative and alternative communication systems and a variety of assistive technologies to support the communication and learning of children with disabilities. Birth Through Kindergarten candidates use strategies to enhance language development and communication skills of children with diverse learning needs. They develop and implement a variety of education and transition plans across a wide range of settings and different learning experiences in collaboration with individuals, families and teams, and teach to mastery and promote generalization of learning. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates understand positive, caring, supportive relationships and interactions as the foundation of early childhood educators' work with young children, and understand how to support child-initiated development and learning in classroom and home settings.
(ii) Candidates understand that the science of learning and child development indicates the need for distinct teaching skills and strategies appropriate to early childhood (such as teacher-scaffolded and -initiated instruction to complement child-initiated learning), along with differentiated instruction to support children's individual needs, including those of bilingual children and children with developmental delays or disabilities.
(iii) Candidates use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate, culturally and linguistically relevant, anti-bias and evidence-based teaching skills and strategies that reflect universal design for learning principles.
(iv) Candidates develop and sustain reflective, responsive, and intentional practice.
(v) Candidates link development, learning experiences, and instruction to promote educational transitions, implementing processes and strategies that support transitions, and assisting the family in planning for transition.
(vi) Candidates design intervention strategies incorporating information from multiple sources and supportive of children's independent functioning in natural environments.
6. Content Knowledge in Early Childhood Curriculum: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates have and apply a solid understanding of the content of the academic disciplines. They understand content knowledge about the central concepts, methods, inquiry and application tools, and structures in each academic discipline. They understand pedagogical content knowledge about how young children learn and process information in each discipline including the learning trajectories for each discipline. They apply this knowledge in using early learning standards and other resources to make decisions about spontaneous and planned teaching practices, and about curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation that will be stimulating, challenging, and meaningful to each child. Birth Through Kindergarten candidates understand the central concepts, structures of the discipline, and tools of inquiry of the content areas they teach and can organize this knowledge, integrate cross-disciplinary skills, and develop meaningful learning progressions for children with diverse learning needs. They understand and use general and specialized content knowledge for teaching across curricular content areas to individualize learning for children with diverse learning needs and can modify general and specialized curricula to make them accessible to all children. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates understand content knowledge and resources, including the central concepts, methods, inquiry and application tools, and structures of the academic disciplines in an early education curriculum.
(ii) Candidates understand pedagogical content knowledge regarding how young children with diverse learning needs learn in each discipline, and how to use the teacher knowledge and practices described in Standards 1 through 4 (e.g., universal design for learning, embedded and differentiated instruction) to support young children's learning in each content area.
(iii) Candidates apply, expand, integrate, and update their content knowledge in the disciplines, knowledge of curriculum content resources, and pedagogical content knowledge to their teaching practice.
(iv) Candidates apply current research to the five developmental domains, play, temperament, and address challenging behavior in learning situations.
(v) Candidates plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate curricula, instruction, and adaptations based on knowledge of individual children, the family, and the community.
7. Professionalism as an Early Childhood Educator: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates identify and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession and serve as informed advocates for young children, families, and the early childhood profession. They know and use ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early childhood education to inform their practice. They have strong communication skills that effectively support their relationships and work with young children, families and colleagues. They understand that diversity is a part of families, cultures, and schools and that complex human issues can interact with the delivery of special education services. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates identify and involve themselves with the early childhood field and serve as informed advocates on behalf of infants and young children and their families, including awareness of trends and issues (legal, ethical, policy) in early childhood education, early childhood special education, and early intervention. This includes participation in activities of professional organizations relevant to early childhood education, early childhood special education, and early intervention.
(ii) Candidates know about the historical, philosophical foundations and legal basis of services for infants and young children with and without disabilities, and know about and uphold ethical standards and other early childhood professional guidelines (e.g., recognizing signs of emotional distress, neglect, and abuse; following reporting procedures; and implementing family services consistent with due process safeguards).
(iii) Candidates engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice.
(iv) Candidates integrate knowledgeable and critical perspectives on early childhood education and develop the habit of intentional, reflective practice, including, applying evidence-based and Council for Exceptional Children Division for Early Childhood recommended practices for infants and young children including those from diverse backgrounds.
(v) Candidates use strong communication skills to effectively support young children's learning and development and work with families and colleagues, including integrating family systems theories into practice; and respecting families' choices and goals.
(vi) Candidates advocate for professional status and working conditions for those who serve infants and young children, and their families.
8. Collaboration: Birth Through Kindergarten candidates collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with exceptionalities, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the needs of all children across a range of learning experiences. They use the theory and elements of effective collaboration, serve as a collaborative resource to colleagues, and use collaboration to promote the well-being of all children across a wide range of settings and collaborators. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates know and apply models and strategies of consultation and collaboration, and the roles of families, school and community personnel in planning individualized programs.
(ii) Candidates understand the concerns of families of children with disabilities and strategies to help address these concerns.
(iii) Candidates know culturally responsive factors that promote effective communication and collaboration among families, school personnel, and community members.
(iv) Candidates understand the structures supporting inter-agency collaboration, including interagency agreements, referral, and consultation.
(v) Candidates collaborate with caregivers, professionals, and agencies to support children's development and learning, including involving families in evaluation of services.
(vi) Candidates implement family-oriented services based on the family's identified resources, priorities, and concerns.
(vii) Candidates provide consultation and coaching in settings serving infants and young children, including use of adult learning principles when consulting with and coaching family members and service providers.
9. Birth Through Kindergarten Field Experiences: Field experiences and clinical practice are planned and sequenced so that Birth Through Kindergarten candidates develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children across the entire developmental period of birth through kindergarten. Field experiences must occur in all three age groups (0 - 2, 3 - 4, and 5) and in at least two early childhood education program settings. Indicators are as follows:
(i) Candidates observe and participate under the supervision of qualified professionals in a variety of settings, including Pre-K, K, licensed childcare programs, Head Start, preschool special education, and grade levels in which children are served according to the Birth Through Kindergarten program grade bands.
(ii) Candidates work effectively over time with children of diverse ages, with children with diverse abilities, and with children reflecting culturally and linguistically diverse family systems.
(iii) Candidates demonstrate ability to work effectively during full-time supervised residency and field experiences (totaling at least 300 clock hours) in at least two different settings, serving children of three different groups (infant/toddler: Birth-2 years; preschool/pre-k: 3-4 years, and Kindergarten: 5 years) and with varying abilities.
(iv) Candidates analyze and evaluate field experiences, including supervised experiences working with parents, and supervised experiences working with interdisciplinary teams of professionals.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in rule GaPSC 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATORS PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.14 Elementary Education (P-5) Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach any subject in grades P-5 and supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer an educator preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the standards and requirements delineated below. The standards are adapted from the standards published in 2019 by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the standards published in 2018 by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), and the standards published in 2007 by the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI). A guidance document accompanying this rule provides supporting explanations for the scope and focus of each standard.
(b) The program shall prepare elementary education professionals to meet the following indicators based on content standards published by the Association for Childhood Education International (2007):
1. Reading, Writing, and Oral Language: Candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in the use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas;
2. Science: Candidates know, understand, and use fundamental concepts of physical, life, and earth/space sciences. Candidates can design and implement age-appropriate inquiry lessons to teach science, to build student understanding for personal and social applications, and to convey the nature of science;
3. Mathematics: Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts and procedures that define number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis. In doing so they consistently engage problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representation;
4. Social Studies: Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies, the integrated study of history, geography, the social sciences, and other related areas, to promote elementary students' abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world;
5. The Arts: Candidates know, understand, and use, as appropriate to their own understanding and skills, the content, functions, and achievements of the performing arts (dance, music, theater) and the visual arts as primary media for communication, inquiry, and engagement among elementary students;
6. Health Education: Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts in the subject matter of health education to create opportunities for student development and practice of skills that contribute to good health; and
7. Physical Education: Candidates know, understand, and use, as appropriate to their own understanding and skills, human movement and physical activity as central elements to foster active, healthy life styles and enhanced quality of life for elementary students.
(c) The program shall prepare elementary education professionals to meet the following pedagogical standards adapted from the standards published in 2019 by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the standards published in 2018 by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).
1. Understanding and Addressing Each Child's Developmental and Learning Needs: Candidates use their understanding of child growth and development, individual differences, and diverse families, cultures, and communities to plan and implement inclusive learning environments that provide each child with equitable access to high quality learning experiences that engage and create learning opportunities for them to meet high standards. They work collaboratively with families to gain a holistic perspective on children's strengths and needs and how to motivate their learning.
(i) Candidates use their understanding of how children grow, develop and learn to plan and implement developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences within environments that take into account the individual strengths and needs of children across early learning centers, elementary classrooms, and digital learning environments.
2. Working with Families and Communities: Candidates use their understanding of individual differences and diverse families, cultures, and communities to plan and implement inclusive learning experiences and environments that build on children's strengths and address their individual needs across early learning centers, elementary classrooms, and digital learning environments.
(i) Candidates work respectfully and reciprocally with families to gain insight into each child in order to maximize his/her development, learning and motivation across early learning centers, elementary classrooms, and digital learning environments.
(ii) Candidates get to know the diverse cultural contexts of children and families to appropriately plan and program experiences.
(iii) Candidates work to respectfully and reciprocally work with families to gain insight into each child in order to maximize development, learning, and motivation.
(iv) Candidates communicate with families in ways which foster partnership and engagement which are respectful of linguistic and culturally diversity.
3. Understanding and Applying Content and Curricular Knowledge for Teaching: To support a coherent curriculum, candidates demonstrate and apply understandings of major concepts, skills, and practices, as they interpret disciplinary curricular standards and related expectations within and across language and literacy, mathematics, science, social studies, approaches to learning, and social emotional learning. Candidates know the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of content areas, including all academic subjects, and can identify resources to deepen their learning. Candidates know how particular content topics and expectations are connected to each other throughout the early learning (Preschool-Kindergarten), primary (1-3), and intermediate (4-5) grades. Candidates demonstrate understandings related to learning, curricular practices and standards, the academic language of the disciplines, and assessment as they consider within and across grade level progressions. Candidates include digital learning opportunities within and across the core disciplines, including the knowledge base and practices of other content areas of fine and performing arts, and physical education.
(i) Candidates demonstrate and apply understandings of the elements of language and literacy critical for purposeful oral, print, and digital communication.
(ii) Candidates demonstrate and apply understandings of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, applications and mathematical practices in varied contexts, and connections within and among mathematical domains.
(iii) Candidates demonstrate and apply understandings and integration of the three dimensions of science and engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts, and major disciplinary core ideas, within the major content areas of science.
(iv) Candidates demonstrate understandings, capabilities, and practices associated with the central concepts and tools in Civics, Economics, Geography, and History, within a framework of informed inquiry.
(v) Candidates demonstrate understanding, capabilities, and practices associated with approaches to learning such as initiative and exploration, attentiveness and persistence, and play for young learners.
(vi) Candidates demonstrate and apply understandings and integration of social emotional development and learning including self-awareness, self-management, responsible decision making, relationship skills, and social awareness.
4. Assessing, Planning, and Designing Contexts for Learning: Candidates assess students, plan instruction, and design classroom contexts for learning. Candidates use developmentally appropriate formative and summative assessment to monitor students' learning and guide instruction. Candidates plan learning activities to promote a full range of competencies for each student. They differentiate instructional materials and activities to address learners' diversity. Candidates foster engagement in learning by establishing and maintaining social norms for classrooms. Candidates build interpersonal relationships with students that generate motivation, and promote students' social and emotional development.
(i) Candidates use content knowledge, appropriate content standards, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child.
(ii) Candidates administer formative and summative assessments regularly to determine students' competencies and learning needs.
(iii) Candidates use assessment results to improve instruction and monitor learning.
(iv) Candidates plan instruction including goals, materials, learning activities, and assessments.
(v) Candidates differentiate instructional plans to meet the needs of diverse students in the classroom.
(vi) Candidates demonstrate competency in a variety of assessment techniques and tools for young children including observation, work samples, and screening.
(vii) Candidates demonstrate the ability to assess learning and development through play for young learners.
5. Guidance, Classroom Management and Challenging Behaviors: Candidates explicitly support motivation and engagement in learning through diverse evidence-based practices.
(i) Candidates implement developmentally appropriate positive direct guidance practices with young children.
(ii) Candidates utilize developmentally appropriate indirect guidance strategies to foster positive and healthy relationships with young children.
(iii) Candidates manage the classroom by establishing and maintaining social norms and developmentally appropriate behavioral expectations.
(iv) Candidates understand how to manage challenging behaviors using developmentally appropriate evidence based practices.
(v) Candidates use developmentally appropriate strategies to promote classroom community and prosocial skills.
6. Supporting Each Child's Learning Using Effective Instruction: Candidates make informed decisions about instruction guided by knowledge of children and assessment of children's learning that result in the use of a variety of effective instructional practices and modalities that employ print and digital appropriate resources. Instruction is delivered using a cohesive sequence of lessons and employing effective instructional practices. Candidates use explicit instruction and effective feedback as appropriate, and use whole class discussions to support and enhance children's learning. Candidates use flexible grouping arrangements, including small group and individual instruction to support effective instruction and improved learning for every child.
(i) Candidates use a variety of instructional practices that support the learning of every child.
(ii) Candidates teach a cohesive sequence of lessons to ensure sequential and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for each child.
(iii) Candidates explicitly teach concepts, strategies, and skills, as developmentally appropriate, to guide learners as they think about and learn academic content.
(iv) Candidates provide constructive feedback to guide children's learning, increase motivation, and improve student engagement.
(v) Candidates lead whole class discussions to investigate specific content, strategies, or skills, and ensure the equitable participation of every child in the classroom.
(vi) Candidates effectively organize and manage small group instruction to provide more focused, intensive instruction and differentiate teaching to meet the learning needs of each child.
(vii) Candidates effectively organize and manage individual instruction to provide targeted, focused, intensive instruction that improves or enhances each child's learning.
(viii) Candidates teach concepts and support development through child selected play utilizing developmentally appropriate strategies for young leaners.
7. Developing as a Professional: Candidates promote learning and development of every child through participation in collaborative learning environments, reflective self-study and professional learning, and involvement in their professional community.
(i) Candidates work collaboratively with colleagues, mentors, and other school personnel to work toward common goals that directly influence every learner's development and growth.
(ii) Candidates design and implement professional learning activities based on ongoing analysis of student learning; self-reflection; professional standards, research and contemporary practices; and standards of ethical professional practice.
(iii) Candidates participate in peer and professional learning communities to enhance student learning.
8. Teaching of Reading: The program shall prepare elementary education professionals to meet the standards for the Reading Endorsement Program as specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.96, READING ENDORSEMENT PROGRAM.
(d) The program shall assure field experiences and clinical practice are planned and sequenced so that candidates develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of pre-Kindergarten through fifth grade children in all three age groups (PK-K, 1-3, and 4-5), and in a variety of settings that offer elementary education. The indicators are as follows:
1. Observe and participate under supervision of qualified professionals in a variety of settings and grade levels in which children are served (such as public and private settings, centers, schools, and community agencies);
2. Work effectively over time with children of diverse ages (preschoolers, or school-age), with children with diverse abilities, and with children reflecting culturally and linguistically diverse family systems;
3. Demonstrate ability to work effectively during full-time supervised residency (student teaching) and/or practica experiences (totaling at least 300 clock hours) in at least two different settings, serving children of three different age groups (PK-K, 1-3, and 4-5) and with varying abilities; and
4. Analyze and evaluate field experiences, including supervised experiences working with parents, and supervised experiences working with interdisciplinary teams of professionals.
(e) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.15 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.16 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.17 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.18 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.19 Middle Grades Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach middle grades, grades 4-8, and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01 REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, GaPSC-approved educator preparation providers shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. Middle Grades Core. The program shall conform to the following standards for Initial Programs in Middle Level Teacher Education adapted from the Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE) Middle Level Teacher Preparation Standards (2012):
(i) Standard 1: Young Adolescent Development

Middle level teacher candidates understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development and use that knowledge in their practice. They demonstrate their ability to apply this knowledge when making curricular decisions, planning and implementing instruction, participating in middle level programs and practices, and providing healthy and effective learning environments for all young adolescents. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their understanding of the implications of diversity on the development of young adolescents and participate successfully in instructional practices that acknowledge and value the diversity of all young adolescents.

(ii) Standard 2: Middle Level Curriculum

Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate a depth and breadth of subject matter content knowledge in the subjects they teach. Middle level teacher candidates understand and use the central concepts, standards, research, and structures of content to plan and implement curriculum that develops all young adolescents' competence in subject matter. They use their knowledge and available resources to design, implement, and evaluate challenging, developmentally responsive curriculum that results in meaningful learning outcomes. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to assist all young adolescents in understanding the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge. They design and teach curriculum that is responsive to all young adolescents' local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, gender expression, gender identity, socioeconomic status, family composition).

(iii) Standard 3: Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization

Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the historical and philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within middle level organizational components. Middle level teacher candidates perform successfully in middle level programs and practices such as interdisciplinary teaming, advisory programs, flexible block schedules, and common teacher planning time.

(iv) Standard 4: Middle Level Instruction and Assessment

Middle level teacher candidates understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to data-informed instruction and assessment. They establish and maintain equitable, caring, and productive learning environments for all young adolescents. They employ a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies, information literacy skills, and technologies to meet the learning needs of all young adolescents (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, gender expression, gender identity, socioeconomic status, family composition). They use instructional strategies and technologies that are especially effective in the subjects that they teach in ways that encourage exploration, creativity, and information literacy skills (e.g., critical thinking, problem solving, evaluation of information gained) so that young adolescents are actively engaged in their learning. Middle level teacher candidates develop and administer assessments and use them as formative and summative tools for assessing prior learning, implementing effective lessons, reflecting on young adolescent learning, and adjusting instruction based on the knowledge gained.

(v) Standard 5: Middle Level Professional Roles

Middle level teacher candidates understand their complex roles as teachers of young adolescents. They engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as middle level professionals. They are informed advocates for young adolescents and middle level education, and work successfully with colleagues, families, community agencies, and community members. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate positive dispositions and orientations toward teaching young adolescents and model high standards of ethical behavior and professional competence. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, critical perspectives on their teaching.

2. Reading and Writing. The program shall prepare candidates who understand and apply principles of teaching reading and writing at the middle grades level and who meet the following elements of the standards specified by the International Reading Association (IRA) Standards for Reading Professionals, 2010. This requirement may be met in a separate three (3) semester-hour course, or content may be embedded in courses and experiences throughout the preparation program:
(i) Candidates use knowledge of adolescent literacy development;
(ii) Candidates apply knowledge of the teaching of reading and writing to adolescents;
(iii) Candidates use knowledge of formal and informal literacy assessment strategies in the content areas;
(iv) Candidates apply knowledge of how to meet the needs of students who read at differing levels; and
(v) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of how to facilitate all students' learning from content area texts.
3. Areas of Concentration. Baccalaureate degree programs shall require preparation of candidates in at least two of the following areas of concentration: reading, language arts, mathematics, science, or social science. Post-baccalaureate programs shall require preparation of candidates in at least one of the following areas of concentration: reading, language arts, mathematics, science, or social science.
(i) An area of concentration shall be defined as a minimum of fifteen semester hours of content that meet the standards of the appropriate national specialized professional association, as described below;
(ii) A course taken to meet the requirements of Standard 2 (above) may be counted toward the fifteen semester hours required for the reading concentration;
(iii) A course taken to meet the requirements of Standard 2 (above) may be counted toward the fifteen semester hours required for the language arts concentration; and
(iv) Reading Concentration. Programs that prepare middle grades teachers in the concentration area of reading shall meet the following standards for classroom teachers of reading published by the International Reading Association (equivalent to the Reading In-Field Endorsement; see Rule 505-3-.96 READING ENDORSEMENT PROGRAM):
(I) Candidates understand the theoretical and evidence-based foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction:
I. Candidates understand major theories and empirical research that describe the cognitive, linguistic, motivational, and socio-cultural foundations of reading, and writing development, processes and components, including word recognition, language comprehension, strategic knowledge, and reading-writing connections:
A. Candidates read the scholarship of the reading profession and recognize the theoretical knowledge base about the reading and writing of adolescents;
B. Candidates explain major theories of reading and writing processes and development in adolescents using supporting research evidence, including the relationship between culture and the native language of English learners as a support system in their learning to read and write in English;
C. Candidates explain language and reading development during adolescence (e.g., word description, language comprehension, strategic knowledge, and reading-writing connections) with supporting evidence from theory and research; and
D. Candidates explain the research and theory of learning environments that support individual motivation to read and write.
II. Candidates understand the role of professional judgment and practical knowledge for improving all students' reading development and achievement:
A. Candidates show fair-mindedness, empathy, and ethical behavior in literacy instruction and when working with other professionals;
B. Candidates use multiple sources of information to guide instructional planning to improve reading achievement for all students;
C. Candidates understand the historically shared knowledge of the profession and changes over time in the perceptions of reading and writing development, processes and components; and
D. Candidates Identify major milestones in reading scholarship and interpret them in light of the current social context.
(II) Candidates use instructional approaches, materials, and an integrated, comprehensive, balanced curriculum to support student learning in reading and writing:
I. Candidates use foundational knowledge to design or implement an integrated, comprehensive and balanced curriculum:
A. Candidates explain how the reading and writing curriculum is related to local, state, national and professional standards;
B. Candidates implement the curriculum based on students' prior knowledge, world experiences, and interests;
C. Candidates evaluate the curriculum to ensure that instructional goals and objectives are met; and
D. Candidates work with the team or department to help ensure interdisciplinary connections in traditional print, digital, and online contexts.
II. Candidates use appropriate and varied instructional approaches, including those that develop word recognition, language comprehension, strategic knowledge, and reading-writing connections:
A. Candidates select and implement instructional approaches that are evidence based and meet student needs;
B. Candidates differentiate instructional approaches to meet students' reading and writing needs in all content areas;
C. Candidates implement and evaluate instruction in each of the following areas as appropriate: concepts of print, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, critical thinking, motivation, and writing;
D. Candidates incorporate traditional print, digital, and online resources as instructional tools to enhance student learning; and
E. Candidates adapt instructional approaches and materials to meet the language-proficiency needs of English learners.
III. Candidates use a wide range of texts (e.g., narrative, expository and poetry) from traditional print, digital, and online resources:
A. Candidates, guided by evidence-based rationale, select and use quality traditional print, digital, and online resources;
B. Candidates identify the resources necessary to build an accessible, multilevel, and diverse classroom library including traditional print, digital, and online resources; and
C. Candidates demonstrate knowledge about various materials including those specifically for adolescent learners and their uses.
(III) Candidates use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing instruction:
I. Candidates understand types of assessment and their purposes, strengths, and limitations:
A. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of established purposes for assessing student performance, including tools for screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring, and measuring outcomes;
B. Candidates describe strengths and limitations of a range of assessment tools and their appropriate uses;
C. Candidates recognize the basic technical adequacy of assessments (e.g., reliability, content and construct validity); and
D. Candidates explain district and state assessment frameworks, proficiency standards, and student benchmarks.
II. Candidates select, develop, administer, and interpret assessments, both traditional print and electronic, for specific purposes:
A. Candidates select or develop appropriate assessment tools to monitor student progress and to analyze instructional effectiveness;
B. Candidates administer classroom and school-based assessments using consistent, fair, and equitable assessment procedures;
C. Candidates interpret and use assessment data to analyze individual, group, and classroom performance and progress; and
D. Candidates collaborate with other teachers and personnel to discuss interpretation of assessment data and their uses in responding to student needs and strengths.
III. Candidates use assessment information to plan and evaluate instruction:
A. Candidates use assessment data to plan instruction systematically and to select appropriate traditional print, digital, and online reading resources;
B. Candidates use assessment data to evaluate students' responses to instruction and to develop relevant next steps for teaching;
C. Candidates interpret patterns in classroom and individual students' data; and
D. Candidates collaborate with other professionals to modify instruction and to plan and evaluate interventions based on assessment data.
IV. Candidates communicate assessment results and implications to a variety of audiences:
A. Candidates communicate assessment purposes and a summary of results to appropriate audiences (i.e., student, parents or guardians, colleagues, and administrators); and
B. Candidates use assessment data and student work samples to discuss relevant implications and goals for reading and writing instruction.
(IV) Candidates create and engage their students in literacy practices that develop awareness, understanding, respect, and a valuing of differences in our society:
I. Candidates recognize, understand, and value the forms of diversity that exist in society and their importance in learning to read and write;
A. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which diversity can be used to strengthen a literate society, making it more productive, more adaptable to change, and more equitable;
B. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the impact of urban, suburban and rural environments on local culture, language and learning to read and write;
C. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which the various forms of diversity interact with reading and writing development; and
D. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between first- and second-language acquisition and literacy development.
II. Candidates use a literacy curriculum and engage in instructional practices that positively impact students' knowledge, beliefs and engagement with the features of diversity:
A. Candidates assess the various forms of diversity that exist in students as well as in the surrounding community;
B. Candidates provide differentiated instruction and instructional materials including traditional print, digital and online resources that capitalize on diversity; and
C. Candidates provide instruction and instructional formats that engage students as agents of their own learning.
III. Candidates develop and implement strategies to advocate for equity:
A. Candidates provide students with linguistic, academic, and cultural experiences that link their communities with the school;
B. Candidates advocate for change in societal practices and institutional structures that are inherently biased or prejudiced against certain groups; and
C. Candidates demonstrate how issues of inequity and opportunities for social justice activism and resiliency can be incorporated into the literacy curriculum.
(V) Candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments:
I. Candidates design the physical environment to optimize students' use of traditional print, digital, and online resources in reading and writing instruction:
A. Candidates arrange their classrooms to provide easy access to books, other instructional materials, and specific areas designed for a variety of individual, small group and whole-class activities; and
B. Candidates modify the arrangements to accommodate students' changing needs.
II. Candidates design a social environment that is low-risk, includes choice, motivation, and scaffolded support to optimize students' opportunities for learning to read and write:
A. Candidates demonstrate a respectful attitude toward all learners and understand the roles for choice, motivation and scaffolded support in creating low-risk and positive social environments;
B. Candidates model and teach students routines for establishing and maintaining positive social environments (e.g., appropriate ways to interact with each other and adults); and
C. Candidates create supportive environments where English learners are encouraged and given many opportunities to use English.
III. Candidates use routines to support reading and writing instruction (e.g., time allocation, transitions from one activity to another, discussions and peer feedback):
A. Candidates understand the role of routines in creating and maintaining positive learning environments for reading and writing instruction using traditional print, digital and online resources; and
B. Candidates create and use routines to support instructional and social goals (e.g., regular steps for sharing and responding to stories, formats for reporting, and efficient transitions among activities, spaces and online resources).
IV. Candidates use a variety of classroom configurations (i.e., whole class, small group, and individual) to differentiate instruction:
A. Candidates use evidence-based rationale to make and monitor flexible instructional grouping options for students;
B. Candidates model and scaffold procedures so students learn to work effectively in a variety of classroom configurations and activities; and
C. Candidates use various practices to differentiate instruction (e.g., cooperative learning, literature circles, partner work and research/investigation groups).
(VI) Candidates recognize the importance of, demonstrate, and facilitate professional learning and leadership as a career-long effort and responsibility:
I. Candidates demonstrate foundational knowledge of adult learning theories and related research about organizational change, professional development, and school culture:
A. Candidates demonstrate awareness of the factors that influence adult learning, organizational change, professional development, and school culture.
II. Candidates display positive dispositions related to their own reading and writing, the teaching of reading and writing, and pursue the development of individual professional knowledge and behaviors:
A. Candidates display reading and writing behaviors and serve as a model to students;
B. Candidates promote student appreciation of the value of reading traditional print, digital and online resources in and out of school;
C. Candidates join and participate in professional literacy organizations, symposia, conferences and workshops;
D. Candidates work collaboratively and successfully with families, colleagues and community members to support students' reading and writing;
E. Candidates demonstrate effective use of technology for improving student learning;
F. Candidates identify specific questions and goals about the teaching of reading and writing and plan specific strategies for finding answers to questions; and
G. Candidates implement plans and use results for their own professional growth.
III. Candidates participate in, design, facilitate, lead, and evaluate effective and differentiated professional development programs:
A. Candidates recognize the importance of professional development for improving reading and writing in schools;
B. Candidates participate individually and with colleagues in professional development programs at the school and district levels; and
C. Candidates apply learning from professional development in instructional practices.
IV. Candidates understand and influence local, state, or national policy decisions:
A. Candidates are informed about important professional issues; and
B. Candidates advocate with various groups (e.g., administrators, school boards, and local, state and federal policymaking bodies) for needed organizational and instructional changes to promote effective literacy instruction.
(v) Language Arts Concentration. Programs that prepare middle grades teachers in the concentration area of language arts shall meet the following standards published by the National Council of Teachers of English (2012):
(I). Content Knowledge
I. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language arts subject matter content that specifically includes literature and multimedia texts as well as knowledge of the nature of adolescents as readers.
A. Candidates are knowledgeable about texts-print and non-print texts, media texts, classic texts and contemporary texts, including young adult-that represent a range of world literatures, historical traditions, genres, and the experiences of different genders, ethnicities, and social classes; they are able to use literary theories to interpret and critique a range of texts.
B. Candidates are knowledgeable about the processes adolescents use to read texts and make meaning through interaction with a variety of media.
II. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language arts subject matter content that specifically includes language and writing as well as knowledge of adolescents as language users.
A. Candidates can compose a range of formal and informal texts taking into consideration the interrelationships among form, audience, context, and purpose; candidates understand that writing is a recursive process; candidates can use contemporary technologies and/or digital media to compose multimodal discourse.
B. Candidates know the conventions of English language as they relate to various rhetorical situations (grammar, usage, and mechanics); they understand the concept of dialect and are familiar with relevant grammar systems (e.g., descriptive and prescriptive); they understand principles of language acquisition; they recognize the influence of English language history on ELA content; and they understand the impact of language on society.
C. Candidates are knowledgeable about processes that adolescents use to compose texts and make meaning through interaction with a variety of media.
(II). Content Pedagogy: Planning Literature and Reading Instruction in ELA
I. Candidates plan instruction and design assessments for reading and the study of literature to promote learning for all students.
A. Candidates use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences utilizing a range of different texts-across genres, periods, forms, authors, cultures, and various forms of media-and instructional strategies that are motivating and accessible to all students, including English language learners, students with special needs, students from diverse language and learning backgrounds, those designated as high achieving, and those at risk of failure.
B. Candidates design a range of authentic assessments (e.g., formal and informal, formative and summative) of reading and literature that demonstrate an understanding of how learners develop and that address interpretive, critical, and evaluative abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and presenting.
C. Candidates plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences in reading that reflect knowledge of current theory and research about the teaching and learning of reading and that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and a variety of reading strategies.
D. Candidates design or knowledgeably select appropriate reading assessments that inform instruction by providing data about student interests, reading proficiencies, and reading processes.
E. Candidates plan instruction that incorporates knowledge of language-structure, history, and conventions-to facilitate students' comprehension and interpretation of print and non-print texts.
F. Candidates plan instruction which, when appropriate, reflects curriculum integration and incorporates interdisciplinary teaching methods and materials.
(III). Content Pedagogy: Planning Composition Instruction in ELA
I. Candidates plan instruction and design assessments for composing texts (i.e., oral, written, and visual) to promote learning for all students.)
A. Candidates use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant composing experiences that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and contemporary technologies and reflect an understanding of writing processes and strategies in different genres for a variety of purposes and audiences.
B. Candidates design a range of assessments for students that promote their development as writers, are appropriate to the writing task, and are consistent with current research and theory. Candidates are able to respond to student writing in process and to finished texts in ways that engage students' ideas and encourage their growth as writers over time.
C. Candidates design instruction related to the strategic use of language conventions (grammar, usage, and mechanics) in the context of students' writing for different audiences, purposes, and modalities.
D. Candidates design instruction that incorporates students' home and community languages to enable skillful control over their rhetorical choices and language practices for a variety of audiences and purposes.
(IV) Learners and Learning: Implementing English Language Arts Instruction
I. Candidates plan, implement, assess, and reflect on research-based instruction that increases motivation and active student engagement, builds sustained learning of English language arts, and responds to diverse students' context-based needs.
A. Candidates plan and implement instruction based on ELA curricular requirements and standards, school and community contexts, and knowledge about students' linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
B. Candidates use data about their students' individual differences, identities, and funds of knowledge for literacy learning to create inclusive learning environments that contextualize curriculum and instruction and help students participate actively in their own learning in ELA.
C. Candidates differentiate instruction based on students' self-assessments and formal and informal assessments of learning in English language arts; candidates communicate with students about their performance in ways that actively involve them in their own learning.
D. Candidates select, create, and use a variety of instructional strategies and teaching resources, including contemporary technologies and digital media, consistent with what is currently known about student learning in English Language Arts.
(IV). Professional Knowledge and Skills
I. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of how theories and research about social justice, diversity, equity, student identities, and schools as institutions can enhance students' opportunities to learn in English Language Arts.
A. Candidates plan and implement English language arts and literacy instruction that promotes social justice and critical engagement with complex issues related to maintaining a diverse, inclusive, and equitable society.
B. Candidates use knowledge of theories and research to plan instruction responsive to students' local, national and international histories, individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender expression, age, appearance, ability, spiritual belief, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and community environment), and languages/dialects as they affect students' opportunities to learn in ELA.
II. Candidates are prepared to interact knowledgeably with students, families, and colleagues based on social needs and institutional roles, engage in leadership and/or collaborative roles in English Language Arts professional learning communities, and actively develop as professional educators.
A. Candidates model literate and ethical practices in ELA teaching, and engage in/reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA.
B. Candidates engage in and reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA that demonstrate understanding of and readiness for leadership, collaboration, ongoing professional development, and community engagement.
(vi) Mathematics Concentration. Programs that prepare middle level teachers in the concentration area of mathematics shall meet the following standards published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics(NCTM) (2012):
(I) Content Knowledge. Candidates of middle level mathematics demonstrate conceptual understanding and apply knowledge of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, connections, and applications within and among mathematical content domains.
(II) Mathematical Practices. Candidates of middle level mathematics solve problems, represent mathematical ideas, reason, prove, use mathematical models, attend to precision, identify elements of structure, generalize, engage in mathematical communication, and make connections as essential mathematical practices. Candidates understand that these practices intersect with mathematical content and that understanding relies on the ability to demonstrate these practices within and among mathematical domains and in their teaching.
(III) Content Pedagogy. Candidates of middle level mathematics apply knowledge of curriculum standards for mathematics and their relationship to student learning within and across mathematical domains. Candidates incorporate research-based mathematical experiences and include multiple instructional mathematical understanding and proficiency. Candidates provide students with opportunities to do mathematics by allowing students to talk about it, connect it to both theoretical and real-world contexts. Candidates plan, select, implement, interpret, and use formative and summative assessments for monitoring student learning, measuring student mathematical understanding, and informing practice.
(IV) Mathematical Learning Environment. Candidates of middle level mathematics exhibit knowledge of young adolescent learning, development, and behavior. They use this knowledge to plan and create sequential learning opportunities grounded in mathematics education research where students are actively engaged in the mathematics they are learning and building from prior knowledge and skills. Candidates demonstrate a positive disposition toward mathematical practices and learning, include culturally relevant perspectives in teaching, and demonstrate equitable and ethical treatment of and high expectations for all students. Candidates use instructional tools such as manipulatives, digital tools, and virtual resources to enhance learning while recognizing the possible limitations of such tools.
(V) Impact on Student Learning. Candidates of middle level mathematics provide evidence demonstrating that as a result of their instruction, secondary students' conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and application of major mathematics concepts in varied contexts have increased. Candidates support the continual development of a productive disposition toward mathematics. Candidates show that new student mathematical knowledge has been created as a consequence of their ability to engage students in mathematical experiences that are developmentally appropriate, require active engagement, and include mathematical-specific technology in building new knowledge.
(VI) Professional Knowledge and Skills. Candidates of middle level mathematics are lifelong learners and recognize that learning is often collaborative. They participate in professional development experiences specific to mathematics and mathematics education, draw upon mathematics education research to inform practice, continuously reflect on their practice, and utilize resources from professional mathematics organizations.
(vii) Science Concentration. Programs that prepare middle grades teachers in the concentration area of science shall meet the following standards adapted from the National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) (2011):
(I) The program shall prepare candidates who can understand and articulate the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. They interrelate and interpret important concepts, ideas, and applications in the fields of biology, physical sciences and earth and space science. The sciences should be interwoven to develop interdisciplinary perspectives and mastery of competencies in each content area: life science, physical science, and Earth and space science:
I. Candidates should be prepared in life science to lead students to understand:
A. Features distinguishing living from nonliving systems;
B. Characteristics distinguishing plants, animals, and other living things;
C. Multiple ways to order and classify living things;
D. Ways organisms function and depend on their environments;
E. Ways organisms are interdependent;
F. Reproductive patterns and life cycles of common organisms;
G. Growth, change, and interactions of populations to form communities;
H. Factors governing the structures, functions, and behaviors of living systems;
I. Multiple systems of classification of organisms;
J. Cycles of matter, and flow of energy, through living and nonliving pathways;
K. Natural selection, adaptation, diversity, and speculation;
L. Structure, function, and reproduction of cells, including microorganisms;
M. Levels of organization from cells to biomes;
N. Reproduction and heredity, including human reproduction and contraception;
O. Behavior of living systems and the role of feedback in their regulation; and
P. Hazards related to living things including allergies, poisons, disease, and aggression.
II. Candidates should be prepared in physical science to lead students to understand:
A. Properties of matter such as mass, solubility, and density;
B. Combinations of matter to form solutions, mixtures, and compounds with different properties;
C. Variations in the physical and chemical state of matter and changes among states;
D. Ordering and classification of matter and energy and their behaviors;
E. Factors affecting the position, motion and behavior of objects;
F. Properties of simple machines and tools, such as levers and screws;
G. Properties of light, electricity, sound, and magnetism;
H. Types of energy, energy sources, and simple transformations of energy;
I. Properties and applications of sound, light, magnetism, and electricity;
J. Potential and kinetic energies and concepts of work;
K. Energy flow in physical and chemical systems, including simple machines;
L. State of matter and bonding in relation to molecular behavior and energy;
M. Conversation of matter and energy;
N. Classifications of elements and compounds;
O. Solvents (especially water) and solutions;
P. Chemical nature of the earth and its living organisms; and
Q. Chemical, electrical and radiation hazards.
III. Candidates should be prepared in Earth and Space Sciences to lead students to understand:
A. Natural objects in the sky and why they change in position and appearance;
B. Causes of the seasons and seasonal changes;
C. Changes in the atmosphere resulting in weather and climate;
D. Changes in the Earth creating and eroding landforms;
E. Basic properties of rocks, minerals, water, air, and energy;
F. Differences between renewable and nonrenewable natural resources;
G. Structures of objects and systems in space;
H. Earth's structure, evolution, history and place in the solar system;
I. Characteristics and importance of oceans, lakes, rivers, and the water cycle;
J. Characteristics of the atmosphere including weather and climate;
K. Changes in the Earth caused by chemical, physical and biological forces;
L. Causes and occurrences of hazards such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes;
M. Characteristics and importance of cycles of matter such as oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen;
N. Characteristics of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources and implications for their use; and
O. Interactions among populations, resources, and environments.
IV. Candidates should be prepared to create interdisciplinary perspectives and to help students understand why science is important to them and to lead students to understand:
A. Differences between science, as investigation, and technology as design;
B. Impact of science and technology on themselves and their community, and on personal and community health;
C. How to use observation, experimentation, data collection, and inference to test ideas and construct concepts scientifically;
D. How to use metric measurement and mathematics for estimating and calculating, collecting and transforming data, modeling, and presenting results;
E. Interrelationships of pure and applied sciences, and technology;
F. Applications of science to local and regional problems and the relationship of science to ones' personal health, well-being, and safety;
G. Historical development and perspectives on science including contributions of underrepresented groups and the evolution of major ideas and theories;
H. Applications of science to the investigation of individual and community problems;
I. Use of technological tools in science, including calculators and computers; and
J. Applications of basic statistics and statistical interpretation to the analysis of data.
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand how students learn and develop scientific knowledge;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who are able to plan for engaging students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans reflect the nature and social context of science, practices of science and engineering, and appropriate safety considerations. Candidates design and select learning activities, instructional settings, and resources-including technology, to achieve those goals; and they plan fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who can in a classroom setting, demonstrate and maintain chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms needed in the science classroom appropriate to their area of licensure;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who can provide evidence to show that students' understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who strive continuously to improve their knowledge and understanding of the ever changing knowledge base of both content and science pedagogy. They identify with and conduct themselves as part of the science education community.
(viii) Social Studies Concentration. Programs that prepare middle grades teachers in the concentration area of social studies shall meet the following standards published by the National Council for the Social Studies:
(I) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of culture and cultural diversity;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of time, continuity, and change;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of people, places, and environment;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individual development and identity;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individuals, groups, and institutions;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of power, authority and governance;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and disposition to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of science, technology and society;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of global connections and interdependence; and
(X) The program shall prepare candidates in social studies who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of civic ideals and practices.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.20 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.21 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.22 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.23 Economics Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach Economics in grades 6-12, and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) A GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the National Council for the Social Studies (2018):
1. Standard 1 Content Knowledge: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of social studies disciplines. Candidates are knowledgeable of disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools; structures of inquiry; and forms of representation.
2. Standard 2 Application of Content Through Planning: Candidates plan learning sequences that leverage social studies knowledge and literacies, technology, and theory and research to support the civic competence of learners as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates plan learning sequences that demonstrate social studies knowledge aligned with the College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework, state-required content standards, and theory and research.
(ii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners with disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools from the social studies disciplines to facilitate social studies literacies for civic life.
(iii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners in disciplinary inquiry to develop social studies literacies for civic life.
(iv) Candidates plan learning sequences where learners create disciplinary forms of representation that convey social studies knowledge and civic competence.
(v) Candidates plan learning sequences that use technology to foster civic competence.
3. Standard 3. Design and Implementation of Instruction and Assessment: Candidates design and implement instruction and authentic assessments, informed by data literacy and learner self-assessment, that promote civic competence.
(i) Candidates design and implement a range of authentic assessments that measure learners' mastery of disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state-required content standards.
(ii) Candidates design and implement learning experiences that engage learners in disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state- required content standards.
(iii) Candidates use theory and research to implement a variety of instructional practices and authentic assessments featuring disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(iv) Candidates exhibit data literacy by using assessment data to guide instructional decision-making and reflect on student learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(v) Candidates engage learners in self-assessment practices that support individualized learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
4. Standard 4: Social Studies Learners and Learning: Candidates use knowledge of learners to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy, create collaborative and interdisciplinary learning environments, and prepare learners to be informed advocates for an inclusive and equitable society.
(i) Candidates use knowledge of learners' socio-cultural assets, learning demands, and individual identities to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy that ensures equitable learning opportunities in social studies.
(ii) Candidates facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary learning environments in which learners use disciplinary facts, concepts, and tools, engage in disciplinary inquiry, and create disciplinary forms of representation.
(iii) Candidates engage learners in ethical reasoning to deliberate social, political, and economic issues, communicate conclusions, and take informed action toward achieving a more inclusive and equitable society.
5. Standard 5. Professional Responsibility and Informed Action: Candidates reflect and expand upon their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions to advance social justice and promote human rights through informed action in schools and/or communities.
(i) Candidates use theory and research to continually improve their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions, and adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.
(ii) Candidates explore, interrogate, and reflect upon their own cultural frames to attend to issues of equity, diversity, access, power, human rights, and social justice within their schools and/or communities.
(iii) Candidates take informed action in schools and/or communities and serve as advocates for learners, the teaching profession, and/or social studies.
(3) Specialty Field. The program shall require a major or equivalent in economics that meets the specialty area standard listed below:
(a) Economics
1. Candidates seeking certification in the field of economics are expected to possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of economics, and should hold a major or an equivalent (as defined in Rule 505-3-.01, paragraph (e) 3. (ii), page 11) in the field.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.24 English Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach English in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer an educator preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards published by the National Council of Teachers of English (2012):
1. Structure of the Program
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who meet appropriate performance assessments for pre-service English language arts teachers.
2. Content Knowledge
(i) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language arts subject matter content that specifically includes literature and multimedia texts as well as knowledge of the nature of adolescents as readers.
(I) Candidates are knowledgeable about texts print and non-print texts, media texts, classic texts and contemporary texts, including young adult that represent a range of world literatures, historical traditions, genres, and the experiences of different genders, ethnicities, and social classes; they are able to use literary theories to interpret and critique a range of texts.
(II) Candidates are knowledgeable about the processes adolescents use to read texts and make meaning through interaction with a variety of media.
(ii) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language arts subject matter content that specifically includes language and writing as well as knowledge of adolescents as language users.
(I) Candidates can compose a range of formal and informal texts taking into consideration the interrelationships among form, audience, context, and purpose; candidates understand that writing is a recursive process; candidates can use contemporary technologies and/or digital media to compose multimodal discourse.
(II) Candidates know the conventions of English language as they relate to various rhetorical situations (grammar, usage, and mechanics); they understand the concept of dialect and are familiar with relevant grammar systems (e.g., descriptive and prescriptive); they understand principles of language acquisition; they recognize the influence of English language history on ELA content; and they understand the impact of language on society.
(III) Candidates are knowledgeable about processes that adolescents use to compose texts and make meaning through interaction with a variety of media.
3. Content Pedagogy: Planning Literature and Reading Instruction in ELA
(i) Candidates plan instruction and design assessments for reading and the study of literature to promote learning for all students.
(I) Candidates use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences utilizing a range of different texts across genres, periods, forms, authors, cultures, and various forms of media and instructional strategies that are motivating and accessible to all students, including English language learners, students with special needs, students from diverse language and learning backgrounds, those designated as high achieving, and those at risk of failure.
(II) Candidates design a range of authentic assessments (e.g., formal and informal, formative and summative) of reading and literature that demonstrate an understanding of how learners develop and that address interpretive, critical, and evaluative abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and presenting.
(III) Candidates plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences in reading that reflect knowledge of current theory and research about the teaching and learning of reading and that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and a variety of reading strategies.
(IV) Candidates design or knowledgeably select appropriate reading assessments that inform instruction by providing data about student interests, reading proficiencies, and reading processes.
(V) Candidates plan instruction that incorporates knowledge of language structure, history, and conventions to facilitate students' comprehension and interpretation of print and non-print texts.
(VI) Candidates plan instruction which, when appropriate, reflects curriculum integration and incorporates interdisciplinary teaching methods and materials.
4. Content Pedagogy: Planning Composition Instruction in ELA
(i) Candidates plan instruction and design assessments for composing texts (i.e., oral, written, and visual) to promote learning for all students.)
(I) Candidates use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant composing experiences that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and contemporary technologies and reflect an understanding of writing processes and strategies in different genres for a variety of purposes and audiences.
(II) Candidates design a range of assessments for students that promote their development as writers, are appropriate to the writing task, and are consistent with current research and theory. Candidates are able to respond to student writing in process and to finished texts in ways that engage students' ideas and encourage their growth as writers over time.
(III) Candidates design instruction related to the strategic use of language conventions (grammar, usage, and mechanics) in the context of students' writing for different audiences, purposes, and modalities.
(IV) Candidates design instruction that incorporates students' home and community languages to enable skillful control over their rhetorical choices and language practices for a variety of audiences and purposes.
5. Learners and Learning: Implementing English Language Arts Instruction
(i) Candidates plan, implement, assess, and reflect on research-based instruction that increases motivation and active student engagement, builds sustained learning of English language arts, and responds to diverse students' context-based needs.
(I) Candidates plan and implement instruction based on ELA curricular requirements and standards, school and community contexts, and knowledge about students' linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
(II) Candidates use data about their students' individual differences, identities, and funds of knowledge for literacy learning to create inclusive learning environments that contextualize curriculum and instruction and help students participate actively in their own learning in ELA.
(III) Candidates differentiate instruction based on students' self-assessments and formal and informal assessments of learning in English language arts; candidates communicate with students about their performance in ways that actively involve them in their own learning.
(IV) Candidates select, create, and use a variety of instructional strategies and teaching resources, including contemporary technologies and digital media, consistent with what is currently known about student learning in English Language Arts.
6. Professional Knowledge and Skills
(i) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of how theories and research about social justice, diversity, equity, student identities, and schools as institutions can enhance students' opportunities to learn in English Language Arts.
(I) Candidates plan and implement English language arts and literacy instruction that promotes social justice and critical engagement with complex issues related to maintaining a diverse, inclusive, and equitable society.
(II) Candidates use knowledge of theories and research to plan instruction responsive to students' local, national and international histories, individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender expression, age, appearance, ability, spiritual belief, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and community environment), and languages/dialects as they affect students' opportunities to learn in ELA..
(ii) Candidates are prepared to interact knowledgeably with students, families, and colleagues based on social needs and institutional roles, engage in leadership and/or collaborative roles in English Language Arts professional learning communities, and actively develop as professional educators.
(I) Candidates model literate and ethical practices in ELA teaching, and engage in/reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA.
(II) Candidates engage in and reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA that demonstrate understanding of and readiness for leadership, collaboration, ongoing professional development, and community engagement.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.25 Geography Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach Geography in grades 6-12, and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) A GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the National Council for the Social Studies (2018):
1. Standard 1 Content Knowledge: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of social studies disciplines. Candidates are knowledgeable of disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools; structures of inquiry; and forms of representation.
2. Standard 2 Application of Content Through Planning: Candidates plan learning sequences that leverage social studies knowledge and literacies, technology, and theory and research to support the civic competence of learners as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates plan learning sequences that demonstrate social studies knowledge aligned with the College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework, state-required content standards, and theory and research.
(ii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners with disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools from the social studies disciplines to facilitate social studies literacies for civic life.
(iii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners in disciplinary inquiry to develop social studies literacies for civic life.
(iv) Candidates plan learning sequences where learners create disciplinary forms of representation that convey social studies knowledge and civic competence.
(v) Candidates plan learning sequences that use technology to foster civic competence.
3. Standard 3. Design and Implementation of Instruction and Assessment: Candidates design and implement instruction and authentic assessments, informed by data literacy and learner self-assessment, that promote civic competence.
(i) Candidates design and implement a range of authentic assessments that measure learners' mastery of disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state-required content standards.
(ii) Candidates design and implement learning experiences that engage learners in disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state- required content standards.
(iii) Candidates use theory and research to implement a variety of instructional practices and authentic assessments featuring disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(iv) Candidates exhibit data literacy by using assessment data to guide instructional decision-making and reflect on student learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(v) Candidates engage learners in self-assessment practices that support individualized learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
4. Standard 4: Social Studies Learners and Learning: Candidates use knowledge of learners to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy, create collaborative and interdisciplinary learning environments, and prepare learners to be informed advocates for an inclusive and equitable society.
(i) Candidates use knowledge of learners' socio-cultural assets, learning demands, and individual identities to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy that ensures equitable learning opportunities in social studies.
(ii) Candidates facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary learning environments in which learners use disciplinary facts, concepts, and tools, engage in disciplinary inquiry, and create disciplinary forms of representation.
(iii) Candidates engage learners in ethical reasoning to deliberate social, political, and economic issues, communicate conclusions, and take informed action toward achieving a more inclusive and equitable society.
5. Standard 5. Professional Responsibility and Informed Action: Candidates reflect and expand upon their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions to advance social justice and promote human rights through informed action in schools and/or communities.
(i) Candidates use theory and research to continually improve their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions, and adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.
(ii) Candidates explore, interrogate, and reflect upon their own cultural frames to attend to issues of equity, diversity, access, power, human rights, and social justice within their schools and/or communities.
(iii) Candidates take informed action in schools and/or communities and serve as advocates for learners, the teaching profession, and/or social studies.
(3) Specialty Field. The program shall require a major or equivalent in geography that meets the specialty area standard listed below:
(a) Geography
1. Candidates seeking certification in the field of geography are expected to possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of geography, and should hold a major or an equivalent (as defined in Rule 505-3-.01, paragraph (e) 3. (ii), page 11) in the field.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.26 History Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach History in grades 6-12, and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) A GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the National Council for the Social Studies (2018):
1. Standard 1 Content Knowledge: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of social studies disciplines. Candidates are knowledgeable of disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools; structures of inquiry; and forms of representation.
2. Standard 2 Application of Content Through Planning: Candidates plan learning sequences that leverage social studies knowledge and literacies, technology, and theory and research to support the civic competence of learners as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates plan learning sequences that demonstrate social studies knowledge aligned with the College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework, state-required content standards, and theory and research.
(ii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners with disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools from the social studies disciplines to facilitate social studies literacies for civic life.
(iii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners in disciplinary inquiry to develop social studies literacies for civic life.
(iv) Candidates plan learning sequences where learners create disciplinary forms of representation that convey social studies knowledge and civic competence.
(v) Candidates plan learning sequences that use technology to foster civic competence.
3. Standard 3. Design and Implementation of Instruction and Assessment: Candidates design and implement instruction and authentic assessments, informed by data literacy and learner self-assessment, that promote civic competence.
(i) Candidates design and implement a range of authentic assessments that measure learners' mastery of disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state-required content standards.
(ii) Candidates design and implement learning experiences that engage learners in disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state- required content standards.
(iii) Candidates use theory and research to implement a variety of instructional practices and authentic assessments featuring disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(iv) Candidates exhibit data literacy by using assessment data to guide instructional decision-making and reflect on student learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(v) Candidates engage learners in self-assessment practices that support individualized learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
4. Standard 4: Social Studies Learners and Learning: Candidates use knowledge of learners to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy, create collaborative and interdisciplinary learning environments, and prepare learners to be informed advocates for an inclusive and equitable society.
(i) Candidates use knowledge of learners' socio-cultural assets, learning demands, and individual identities to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy that ensures equitable learning opportunities in social studies.
(ii) Candidates facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary learning environments in which learners use disciplinary facts, concepts, and tools, engage in disciplinary inquiry, and create disciplinary forms of representation.
(iii) Candidates engage learners in ethical reasoning to deliberate social, political, and economic issues, communicate conclusions, and take informed action toward achieving a more inclusive and equitable society.
5. Standard 5. Professional Responsibility and Informed Action: Candidates reflect and expand upon their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions to advance social justice and promote human rights through informed action in schools and/or communities.
(i) Candidates use theory and research to continually improve their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions, and adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.
(ii) Candidates explore, interrogate, and reflect upon their own cultural frames to attend to issues of equity, diversity, access, power, human rights, and social justice within their schools and/or communities.
(iii) Candidates take informed action in schools and/or communities and serve as advocates for learners, the teaching profession, and/or social studies.
(3) Specialty Field. The program shall require a major or equivalent in history that meets the specialty area standard listed below:
(a) History
1. Candidates seeking certification in the field of history are expected to possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of history, and should hold a major or an equivalent (as defined in Rule 505-3-.01, paragraph (e) 3. (ii), page 11) in the field.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.27 Mathematics Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach mathematics in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer an educator preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards revised in 2012 by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM):
1. Content Knowledge. Candidates of secondary mathematics demonstrate conceptual understanding and apply knowledge of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, connections, and applications within and among mathematical content domains.
(i) Candidates demonstrate conceptual understanding and apply knowledge of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, applications in varied contexts, and connections within and among mathematical domains including Number, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Statistics, Probability, Calculus, and Discrete Mathematics as outlined in the 2012 NCTM NCATE Mathematics Content for Secondary.
2. Mathematical Practices. Candidates of secondary mathematics solve problems, represent mathematical ideas, reason, prove, use mathematical models, attend to precision, identify elements of structure, generalize, engage in mathematical communication, and make connections as essential mathematical practices. Candidates understand that these practices intersect with mathematical content and that understanding relies on the ability to demonstrate these practices within and among mathematical domains and in their teaching.
(i) Candidates use problem solving to develop conceptual understanding and build new mathematical knowledge, make sense of a wide variety of problems and persevere in solving them, apply and adapt a variety of strategies in solving problems confronted within the field of mathematics and other contexts, and formulate and test conjectures in order to frame generalizations, while monitoring and reflecting on the process of mathematical problem solving.
(ii) Candidates reason abstractly, reflectively, and quantitatively with attention to units, constructing viable arguments and proofs, and critiquing the reasoning of others; represent and model generalizations using mathematics; recognize structure and express regularity in patterns of mathematical reasoning; use multiple representations to model and describe mathematics; translate fluidly among multiple representations; and utilize appropriate mathematical vocabulary and symbols to communicate mathematical ideas to others.
(iii) Candidates formulate, represent, analyze, and interpret mathematical models derived from real-world contexts or mathematical problems.
(iv) Candidates organize mathematical thinking and use the language of mathematics to express ideas precisely, both orally and in writing to multiple audiences.
(v) Candidates demonstrate the interconnectedness of mathematical ideas and how they build on one another and recognize and apply mathematical connections among mathematical ideas and across various content areas and real-world contexts.
(vi) Candidates model how the development of mathematical understanding within and among mathematical domains intersects with the mathematical practices of problem solving, reasoning, communicating, connecting, and representing.
3. Content Pedagogy. Candidates of secondary mathematics apply knowledge of curriculum standards for mathematics and their relationship to student learning within and across mathematical domains. Candidates incorporate research-based mathematical experiences and include multiple instructional mathematical understanding and proficiency. Candidates provide students with opportunities to do mathematics by allowing students to talk about it and connect it to both theoretical and real-world contexts. Candidates plan, select, implement, interpret, and use formative and summative assessments for monitoring student learning, measuring student mathematical understanding, and informing practice.
(i) Candidates apply knowledge of curriculum standards for secondary mathematics and their relationship to student learning within and across mathematical domains.
(ii) Candidates analyze and consider research in planning for and leading students in rich mathematical learning experiences.
(iii) Candidates plan lessons and units that incorporate a variety of strategies, differentiated instruction for diverse populations, and mathematics-specific and instructional technologies in building all students' conceptual understanding and procedural proficiency.
(iv) Candidates provide students with opportunities to communicate about mathematics and make connections among mathematics, other content areas, everyday life, and the workplace.
(v) Candidates implement techniques related to student engagement and communication including selecting high quality tasks, guiding mathematical discussions, identifying key mathematical ideas, identifying and addressing student misconceptions, and employing a range of questioning strategies.
(vi) Candidates plan, select, implement, interpret, and use formative and summative assessments to inform instruction by reflecting on mathematical proficiencies essential for all students.
(vii) Candidates monitor students' progress, make instructional decisions, and measure students' mathematical understanding and ability using formative and summative assessments.
4. Mathematical Learning Environment. Candidates of secondary mathematics exhibit knowledge of adolescent learning, development, and behavior. They use this knowledge to plan and create sequential learning opportunities grounded in mathematics education research where students are actively engaged in the mathematics they are learning and building from prior knowledge and skills. Candidates demonstrate a positive disposition toward mathematical practices and learning, include culturally relevant perspectives in teaching, and demonstrate equitable and ethical treatment of and high expectations for all students. Candidates use instructional tools such as manipulatives, digital tools, and virtual resources to enhance learning while recognizing the possible limitations of such tools.
(i) Candidates exhibit knowledge of adolescent learning, development, and behavior and demonstrate a positive disposition toward mathematical processes and learning.
(ii) Candidates plan and create developmentally appropriate, sequential, and challenging learning opportunities grounded in mathematics education research in which students are actively engaged in building new knowledge from prior knowledge and experiences.
(iii) Candidates incorporate knowledge of individual differences and the cultural and language diversity that exists within classrooms and include culturally relevant perspectives as a means to motivate and engage all students.
(iv) Candidates demonstrate equitable and ethical treatment of and high expectations for all students.
(v) Candidates apply mathematical content and pedagogical knowledge to select and use instructional tools such as manipulatives and physical models, drawings, virtual environments, spreadsheets, presentation tools, and mathematics-specific technologies such as graphing tools, interactive geometry software, computer algebra systems, and statistical packages; and make sound decisions about when such tools enhance teaching and learning, recognizing both the insights to be gained and possible limitations of such tools.
5. Impact on Student Learning. Candidates of secondary mathematics provide evidence demonstrating that as a result of their instruction, secondary students' conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and application of major mathematics concepts in varied contexts have increased. Candidates support the continual development of a productive disposition toward mathematics. Candidates show that new student mathematical knowledge has been created as a consequence of their ability to engage students in mathematical experiences that are developmentally appropriate, require active engagement, and include mathematical-specific technology in building new knowledge.
(i) Candidates verify that secondary students demonstrate conceptual understanding; procedural fluency; the ability to formulate, represent, and solve problems; logical reasoning and continuous reflection on that reasoning; productive disposition toward mathematics; and the application of mathematics in a variety of contexts within major mathematical domains.
(ii) Candidates engage students in developmentally appropriate mathematical activities and investigations that require active engagement and include mathematics-specific technology in building new knowledge.
(iii) Candidates collect, organize, analyze, and reflect on diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment evidence and determine the extent to which students' mathematical proficiencies have increased as a result of their instruction.
6. Professional Knowledge and Skills. Candidates of secondary mathematics are lifelong learners and recognize that learning is often collaborative. They participate in professional development experiences specific to mathematics and mathematics education, draw upon mathematics education research to inform practice, continuously reflect on their practice, and utilize resources from professional mathematics organizations.
(i) Candidates take an active role in their professional growth by participating in professional development experiences that directly relate to the learning and teaching of mathematics.
(ii) Candidates engage in continuous and collaborative learning that draws upon research in mathematics education to inform practice, enhance learning opportunities for all students' mathematical knowledge development; involve colleagues, other school professionals, families, and various stakeholders; and advance their development as a reflective practitioner.
(iii) Candidates utilize resources from professional mathematics education organizations such as print, digital, and virtual resources/collections.
7. Secondary Mathematics Field Experiences and Clinical Practice. Candidates of secondary mathematics engage in a planned sequence of field experiences and clinical practice under the supervision of experienced and highly qualified mathematics teachers. They develop a broad experiential base of knowledge, skills, effective approaches to mathematics teaching and learning, and professional behaviors across both middle and high school settings that involve a diverse range and varied groupings of students. Candidates experience a full-time student teaching/internship in secondary mathematics directed by university and college faculty with secondary mathematics teaching experience or equivalent knowledge base.
(i) Candidates engage in a sequence of planned field experiences and clinical practice prior to a full-time student teaching/internship experience that include observing and participating in both middle and high school mathematics classrooms and working with a diverse range of students individually, in small groups, and in large class settings under the supervision of experienced and highly qualified mathematics teachers in varied settings that reflect cultural, ethnic, linguistic, gender, and learning differences.
(ii) Candidates experience full-time student teaching/internship in secondary mathematics that is supervised by a highly qualified mathematics teacher and a university or college supervisor with secondary mathematics teaching experience or equivalent knowledge base.
(iii) Candidates develop knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors across both middle and high school settings, examine the nature of mathematics, how mathematics should be taught, and how students learn mathematics; and observe and analyze a range of approaches to mathematics teaching and learning, focusing on tasks, discourse, environment, and assessment.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.28 Political Science Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach Political Science in grades 6-12, and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) A GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the National Council for the Social Studies (2018):
1. Standard 1 Content Knowledge: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of social studies disciplines. Candidates are knowledgeable of disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools; structures of inquiry; and forms of representation.
2. Standard 2 Application of Content Through Planning: Candidates plan learning sequences that leverage social studies knowledge and literacies, technology, and theory and research to support the civic competence of learners as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates plan learning sequences that demonstrate social studies knowledge aligned with the College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework, state-required content standards, and theory and research.
(ii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners with disciplinary concepts, facts, and tools from the social studies disciplines to facilitate social studies literacies for civic life.
(iii) Candidates plan learning sequences that engage learners in disciplinary inquiry to develop social studies literacies for civic life.
(iv) Candidates plan learning sequences where learners create disciplinary forms of representation that convey social studies knowledge and civic competence.
(v) Candidates plan learning sequences that use technology to foster civic competence.
3. Standard 3. Design and Implementation of Instruction and Assessment: Candidates design and implement instruction and authentic assessments, informed by data literacy and learner self-assessment, that promote civic competence.
(i) Candidates design and implement a range of authentic assessments that measure learners' mastery of disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state-required content standards.
(ii) Candidates design and implement learning experiences that engage learners in disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence and demonstrate alignment with state- required content standards.
(iii) Candidates use theory and research to implement a variety of instructional practices and authentic assessments featuring disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(iv) Candidates exhibit data literacy by using assessment data to guide instructional decision-making and reflect on student learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
(v) Candidates engage learners in self-assessment practices that support individualized learning outcomes related to disciplinary knowledge, inquiry, and forms of representation for civic competence.
4. Standard 4: Social Studies Learners and Learning: Candidates use knowledge of learners to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy, create collaborative and interdisciplinary learning environments, and prepare learners to be informed advocates for an inclusive and equitable society.
(i) Candidates use knowledge of learners' socio-cultural assets, learning demands, and individual identities to plan and implement relevant and responsive pedagogy that ensures equitable learning opportunities in social studies.
(ii) Candidates facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary learning environments in which learners use disciplinary facts, concepts, and tools, engage in disciplinary inquiry, and create disciplinary forms of representation.
(iii) Candidates engage learners in ethical reasoning to deliberate social, political, and economic issues, communicate conclusions, and take informed action toward achieving a more inclusive and equitable society.
5. Standard 5. Professional Responsibility and Informed Action: Candidates reflect and expand upon their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions to advance social justice and promote human rights through informed action in schools and/or communities.
(i) Candidates use theory and research to continually improve their social studies knowledge, inquiry skills, and civic dispositions, and adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.
(ii) Candidates explore, interrogate, and reflect upon their own cultural frames to attend to issues of equity, diversity, access, power, human rights, and social justice within their schools and/or communities.
(iii) Candidates take informed action in schools and/or communities and serve as advocates for learners, the teaching profession, and/or social studies.
(3) Specialty Field. The program shall require a major or equivalent in political science that meets the specialty area standard listed below:
(a) Political Science
1. Candidates seeking certification in the field of political science are expected to possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of political science, and should hold a major or an equivalent (as defined in Rule 505-3-.01, paragraph (e) 3. (ii), page 11) in the field.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.29 Science Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach broad field science and/or the science specialties of biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERSAND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS. The standards are based on National Science Teachers Association 2011 standards.
(2) Requirements.
(a) A GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer an educator preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:

1. Content Knowledge. Effective teachers of science understand and articulate the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. They interrelate and interpret important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of certification. Secondary teachers are generally prepared with depth and breadth in the content of a given field. The major divisions of the natural sciences are biology, chemistry, the Earth and space sciences, and physics. All teachers certified in a given discipline should know, understand, and teach with the breadth of understanding reflected in the core competencies for that discipline. Specialists in a discipline should also have achieved the advanced competencies for that discipline and supporting competencies from related disciplines as indicated in the following:

(i) Biology.
(I) Core Competencies. All teachers of biology should be prepared to lead students to understand:
I. Life processes in living systems including organization of matter and energy;
II. Similarities and differences among animals, plants, fungi, microorganisms, and viruses;
III. Ecological systems including the interrelationships and dependencies of organisms with each other and their environments;
IV. Population dynamics and the impact of population on its environment;
V. General concepts of genetics and heredity;
VI. Organizations and functions of cells and multi-cellular systems;
VII. Behavior of organisms and their relationships to social systems;
VIII. Regulation of biological systems including homeostatic mechanisms;
IX. Fundamental processes of modeling and investigating in the biological sciences;
X. Applications of biology in environmental quality and in personal and community health;
XI. Bioenergetics including major biochemical pathways;
XII. Molecular genetics and heredity and mechanisms of genetic modification; and
XIII. Molecular basis for evolutionary theory and classification.
(II) Advanced Competencies. In addition to these core competencies, teachers of biology as a primary field should be prepared to effectively lead students to understand:
I. Biochemical interactions of organisms and their environments;
II. Causes, characteristics and avoidance of viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases;
III. Molecular genetics;
IV. Issues related to living systems such as genetic modification, uses of biotechnology, cloning, and pollution from farming;
V. Historical development and perspectives in biology including contributions of significant figures and underrepresented groups, and the evolution of theories in biology; and
VI. How to design, conduct, and report research in biology.
(III) Supporting Competencies. All teachers of biology should also be prepared to effectively apply concepts from other sciences and mathematics to the teaching of biology including basic concepts of:
I. Chemistry, including general chemistry, biochemistry and basic laboratory techniques;
II. Physics, including light, sound, optics, electricity, energy and order, and magnetism;
III. Earth and space sciences, including energy and geochemical cycles, climate, oceans, weather, natural resources, and changes in the Earth; and
IV. Mathematics, including probability and statistics.
(ii) Chemistry.
(I) Core Competencies. All teachers of chemistry should be prepared to lead students to understand:
I. Fundamental structures of atoms and molecules;
II. Basic principles of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding;
III. Periodicity of physical and chemical properties of elements;
IV. Laws of conservation of matter and energy;
V. Fundamentals of chemical kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics;
VI. Kinetic molecular theory and gas laws;
VII. Mole concept, stoichiometry, and laws of composition;
VIII. Solutions, colloids, and colligative properties;
IX. Acids/base chemistry;
X. Fundamental oxidation-reduction chemistry, fundamental organic chemistry and biochemistry;
XI. Fundamental biochemistry;
XII. Nature of Science and the fundamental processes in chemistry;
XIII. Applications of chemistry in personal and community health and environmental quality;
XIV. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry; and
XV. Historical development and perspectives in chemistry.
(II) Advanced Competencies. In addition to the core competencies, teachers of chemistry as a primary field should also be prepared to effectively lead students to understand:
I. Principles of electrochemistry;
II. Transition elements and coordination compounds;
III. Molecular orbital theory, aromaticity, metallic and ionic structures, and correlation to properties of matter;
IV. Advanced concepts in chemical kinetics, equilibrium, gas laws, and thermodynamics;
V. Lewis structures and molecular geometry;
VI. Advanced concepts in acid/base chemistry, including buffers;
VII. Major biological compounds and reactions;
VIII. Solvent system concepts;
IX. Chemical reactivity and molecular structure including electronic and steric effects;
X. Organic chemistry;
XI. Historical development and perspective in chemistry including synthesis, reaction, mechanisms, and aromaticity;
XII. Green chemistry and sustainability; and
XIII. How to design, conduct, and report research in chemistry.
(III) Supporting Competencies. All teachers of chemistry should be prepared to effectively apply concepts from other sciences and mathematics to the teaching of chemistry including:
I. Biology, including molecular biology, and ecology;
II. Earth science, including geochemistry, cycles of matter, and energetics of Earth systems;
III. Physics, including energy, electricity, and magnetism. Also including properties and function of waves, of motion, and of forces;
IV. Mathematical and statistical concepts, including the use of statistics, of differential equations, and of calculus;
V. Earth Science, including geochemistry, cycles of matter, and energetics of Earth systems;
VI. Physics, including energy, stellar evolution, properties and functions of waves, motions and forces, electricity, and magnetism; and
VII. Mathematical and statistical concepts and skills, including statistics and the use of differential equations and calculus.
(iii) Earth and Space Sciences.
(I) Core Competencies. All teachers of the Earth and space sciences should be prepared to lead students to understand:
I. Characteristics of land, atmosphere, and ocean systems on Earth;
II. Properties, measurement, and classification of Earth materials;
III. Changes in the Earth including land formation and erosion;
IV. Geochemical cycles including biotic and abiotic systems;
V. Energy flow and transformation in Earth systems;
VI. Hydrological features of the Earth;
VII. Patterns and changes in the atmosphere, weather, and climate;
VIII. Origin, evolution, and planetary behaviors of Earth;
IX. Origin, evolution, and properties of the universe;
X. Fundamental processes of investigating in the Earth and space sciences;
XI. Sources and limits of natural resources; and
XII. Applications of Earth and space sciences to environmental quality and to personal and community health and welfare.
(IV) Advanced Competencies. In addition to the core competencies, teachers of the Earth and space sciences as a primary field should be prepared to effectively lead students to understand:
I. Gradual and catastrophic changes in the Earth;
II. Oceans and their relationship to changes in atmosphere and climate;
III. Hydrological cycles and problems of distribution and use of water;
IV. Dating of the Earth and other objects in the universe;
V. Structures and interactions of energy and matter in the universe;
VI. Impact of changes in the Earth on the evolution and distribution of living things;
VII. Issues related to changes in Earth systems such as global climate change, mine subsidence, and channeling of waterways;
VIII. Historical development and perspectives including contributions of significant figures and underrepresented groups, and the evolution of theories in the fields of Earth and Space Sciences; and
IX. How to design, conduct, and report research in the Earth and space sciences.
(V) Supporting Competencies. All teachers of Earth and space sciences should be prepared to effectively apply concepts from other sciences and mathematics to the teaching of Earth and space sciences including concepts of:
I. Biology, including evolution, ecology, population dynamics, and the flow of energy and materials through Earth systems;
II. Chemistry, including broad concepts and basic laboratory techniques of inorganic and organic chemistry;
III. Physics, including electricity, forces and motion, energy, magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and sound; and
IV. Mathematics, including statistics and probability.
(iv) Physics.
(I) Core Competencies. All teachers of physics should be prepared to lead students to understand:
I. Energy, work, and power;
II. Motion, major forces, and momentum;
III. Newtonian physics including engineering applications;
IV. Conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and charge;
V. Physical properties of matter;
VI. Kinetic-molecular motion and atomic models;
VII. Radioactivity, nuclear reactors, fission, and fusion;
VIII. Wave theory, sound, light, the electromagnetic spectrum and optics;
IX. Electricity and magnetism;
X. Fundamental processes of investigating in physics; and
XI. Applications of physics in environmental quality and to personal and community health.
(II) Advanced Competencies. In addition to the core competencies, teachers of physics as a primary field should be prepared to effectively lead students to understand:
I. Thermodynamics and energy-matter relationships;
II. Nuclear physics including matter-energy duality and reactivity;
III. Angular rotation and momentum, centripetal forces, and vector analysis;
IV. Quantum mechanics, space-time relationships, and special relativity;
V. Models of nuclear and subatomic structures and behavior;
VI. Light behavior, including wave-particle duality and models;
VII. Electrical phenomena including electric fields, vector analysis, energy, potential, capacitance, and inductance;
VIII. Issues related to physics such as disposal of nuclear waste, light pollution, shielding communication systems and weapons development;
IX. Historical development and cosmological perspectives in physics including contributions of significant figures and underrepresented groups, and evolution of theories in physics;
X. How to design, conduct, and report research in physics; and
XI. Applications of physics and engineering in society, business, industry, and health fields.
(VI) Supporting Competencies. All teachers of physics should be prepared to effectively apply concepts from other sciences and mathematics to the teaching of physics including concepts of:
I. Biology, including organization of life, bioenergetics, biomechanics, and cycles of matter;
II. Chemistry, including organization of matter and energy, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, and bonding;
III. Earth sciences and space sciences related to structure of the universe, energy, and interactions of matter; and
IV. Mathematical and statistical concepts and skills, including statistics and the use of differential equations and calculus.
2. Content Pedagogy. Effective teachers of science understand how students learn and develop scientific knowledge. Pre-service teachers use scientific inquiry to develop this knowledge.
3. Learning Environments.Effective teachers of science are able to plan for engaging students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. Candidates design and select learning activities, instructional settings, and resources--including technology, to achieve those goals; and they plan fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
4. Safety.Effective teachers of science can, in a P-12 classroom setting, demonstrate and maintain chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms needed in the P-12 science classroom appropriate to their area of licensure.
5. Impact on Student Learning.Effective teachers of science provide evidence to show that P-12 students' understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization.
6. Professional Knowledge and Skills.Effective teachers of science strive continuously to improve their knowledge and understanding of the ever changing knowledge base of both content and science pedagogy. They identify with and conduct themselves as part of the science education community.
(b) Programs may be offered as single field programs in one of the specialty fields of biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics; as dual field programs in two of the specialty fields; and/or as broad field science. Requirements are based on the National Science Teachers Association 2011 Standards.
1. Single Field Program Requirements.
(i) Candidates will meet a minimum of eighty (80) percent of the core, advanced, and supporting competencies in a specialty field as indicated in (2)(a).
2. Dual Field Program Requirements.
(i) Candidates will meet a minimum of eighty (80) percent of the core, advanced, and supporting competencies in one of the specialty fields, and a minimum of eighty (80) percent of the core competencies and a minimum of sixty (60) percent of the advanced competencies in another specialty field as indicated in (2)(a).
3. Broad field Program Requirements.
(i) Candidates will meet a minimum of eighty (80) percent of the core, advanced, and supporting competencies in a primary specialty field, and a minimum of eighty (80) percent of core and supporting competencies in two or more additional specialty fields as indicated in (2)(a).
(c) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.30 Speech Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states criteria for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach speech in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERSAND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer an educator preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with basic communication concepts and theories;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who can identify various communication media and discuss the changing nature of media and the ways in which different media enable and constrain communication;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who know and apply critical skills associated with communicative arts, including characterization of the relationship between the critic and the critical object, identification of the social value of criticism and application of various stances to a variety of communicative acts;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who apply principles of responsible communication, including consideration of philosophies of communication that assign central importance to concepts of free speech, ethics, and their impact upon communicative acts;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who model practical communication skills related to public speaking, oral interpretation, group decision-making, television and radio, film, print, interpersonal, and organizational communication;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who can direct student co-curricular activities such as debate, forensics, radio management, and film society;
7. The program shall prepare candidates who can enforce the rules of parliamentary procedure; and
8. The program shall prepare candidates who know the history of theater, and can plan, conduct, and direct plays in schools.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.31 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.32 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.33 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.34 Agriculture Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach agriculture in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall prepare candidates who know and can apply the content of the biological, botanical, physical, natural and applied sciences relevant to practical solutions for agricultural problems;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who know and can apply the principles of plant science, animal science, agricultural business and leadership, agricultural mechanics, and forestry; and can apply technologies from these areas that are appropriate to the agriculture industry;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate competence in one or more of the specialized occupational areas: agricultural production and marketing; agricultural equipment and supplies; agricultural electrification; agricultural metal fabrication; agriculture product processing; ornamental horticulture; floriculture and floral design; agricultural business; planning, and analysis; natural resource management; environmental science; forestry; agriculture animal production; veterinary science; or companion animal production and care;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the ability to conduct a complete program of study in agricultural education including classroom and laboratory instruction, Future Farmers of America (FFA) leadership development, and supervised agricultural experiences (SAE's) for students;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who can apply principles of production agriculture and agricultural economics;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who can plan for classroom and lab management, student behavior management, curriculum and instructional delivery systems, manage instructional laboratories, implement instructional techniques, and evaluate student learning in agricultural education; and
7. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the ability to work with community, industry, governmental agencies, program advisory committees, as well as local and state school personnel to provide a desirable educational experience for students in agricultural education.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.35 Business Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach business in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERSAND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of business organization structure and function;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of the philosophy and purposes of Career Technical Education (CTE);
3. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of the theories and skills of accounting, financial services and financial literacy;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who can apply problem-solving skills in business and information technology;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who are competent in use and application of computer applications (word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and graphic) and basic information technology (programming, web design, digital design, computer science, and networking);
6. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate competence in use and application of emerging technology;
7. The program shall prepare candidates who know principles and application of business mathematics, business law, and business communication skills;
8. The program shall prepare candidates who are knowledgeable about business management techniques, leadership styles, marketing strategies and use in business, and economic theories and systems, including consumer economics concepts;
9. The program shall prepare candidates who have knowledge of teaching employability skills, business ethics, leadership skills, international business practices, and career opportunities in business and information technology related fields;
10. The program shall prepare candidates who can operate the student organization-Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), the co-curricular organization aligned with business education curricula;
11. The program shall prepare candidates who can implement teaching strategies and methods for teaching business education and standards; and
12. The program shall prepare candidates who work with business and industry leaders in establishing school/business partnerships and advisory committees.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.36 Family and Consumer Sciences Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach family and consumer sciences in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERSAND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards published by the National Association of Teacher Educators for Family and Consumer Sciences (2009):
1. The program shall prepare candidates who analyze family, community, and work interrelationships; investigate career paths; examine family and consumer sciences careers; and apply career decision-making and transitioning processes;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who use resources responsibly to address the diverse needs and goals of individuals, families, and communities in family and consumer science areas such as resource management, consumer economics, financial literacy, living environments, and textiles and apparel;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who apply principles of human development, interpersonal relationships, and family to strengthen individuals and families across the lifespan in contexts such as parenting, care giving, and the workplace;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who promote nutrition, food, and wellness practices that enhance individual and family well being across the lifespan and address related concerns in a global society;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who develop, justify, and implement curricula that address perennial and evolving family, career, and community issues; reflect the integrative nature of family and consumer sciences; and integrate core academic areas;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who facilitate students' critical thinking and problem solving in family and consumer sciences through varied instructional strategies and technologies and through responsible management of resources in schools, communities, and the workplace;
7. The program shall prepare candidates who create and implement a safe, supportive learning environment that shows sensitivity to diverse needs, values, and characteristics of students, families, and communities;
8. The program shall prepare candidates who engage in ethical professional practice based on the history and philosophy of family and consumer sciences and career and technical education through civic engagement, advocacy, and ongoing professional development;
9. The program shall prepare candidates who assess, evaluate, and improve student learning and programs in family and consumer sciences using appropriate criteria, standards, and processes;
10. The program shall prepare candidates who integrate the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America student organization into the program to foster students' academic growth, application of family and consumer sciences content, leadership, service learning, and career development; and
11. The program shall prepare candidates who work with business, industry and labor in establishing school/business partnerships and advisory committees.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.37 Healthcare Science Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach healthcare-related occupations in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERSAND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) Candidates shall meet eligibility criteria outlined in Rule 505-2-.70 HEALTHCARE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (HSTE).
(b) The program shall have established procedures for evaluating and assessing work experience.
(c) To receive approval GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall prepare candidates who can interpret, develop and implement curriculum for healthcare science, including instructional methods of teaching, for the classroom, and lab activities;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the organizational structure and historical development of career and technical education and its relationship to American business, industry, and careers;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who integrate academic and career and technical education content in the curriculum and in implementing interdisciplinary activities;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who organize, manage, plan and supervise the healthcare science lab;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who can adapt instruction for students from special populations in healthcare science programs;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with secondary school guidance and counseling practices, assessment instruments and procedures, and assisting students in career development and placement activities through field based experiences in a variety of healthcare settings.
7. The program shall prepare candidates who are competent in current technology for teaching in a healthcare science program;
8. The program shall prepare candidates who know and implement safety practices and procedures;
9. The program shall introduce the candidate to career technical student organizations (CTSO) (HOSA-Future Health Professionals) and provide information and resources to help them be able to facilitate the CTSO; and
10. The program shall prepare candidates who work with business, industry, health and medical related agencies, and labor in establishing school/business/community partnerships and advisory committees.
(d) The program shall require professional field experience(s) sequenced over a period of time during the matriculation of the candidate. If the person is already employed as a teacher, a structured, supervised field experience shall be provided in cooperation with the local educational agency.
(e) The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with the framework of health science education and the National Health Science Standards advocated by the National Health Science Consortium.
(e) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERSAND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.38 Marketing Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach marketing in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall prepare candidates in the following curriculum areas:
(i) Fundamentals of Marketing (i.e., market identification, market share, target market, market segmentation, marketing mix, etc.);
(ii) Foundational skills (i.e., economic theory and systems, basic business concepts, customer service skills, technology skills, etc.);
(iii) Terminology and concepts particular to the specialized area of marketing;
(iv) Marketing information management;
(v) Product and service management;
(vi) Pricing;
(vii) Distribution;
(viii) Promotion;
(ix) Selling;
(x) Entrepreneurship; and
(xi) Finance.
2. The program shall prepare candidates who can plan, develop, and administer a marketing program that includes classroom instruction and laboratory (school-based enterprise) experiences and various work-based learning experiences;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with job requirements and career opportunities in marketing, marketing-related, and management fields;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who are able to place secondary school students in work and community-based settings for demonstration of master of curriculum;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who have had work experience in marketing requiring knowledge and skills above entry level positions;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who can implement and operate the nationally-affiliated Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO) known as DECA;
7. The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with the history, foundations, and organization of Career and Technical Education Programs;
8. The program shall prepare candidates who are equipped to develop and utilize advisory committees made up primarily of business, industry, and community leaders;
9. The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of and implement safety practices and procedures in the classroom, the lab, and the community where DECA-sponsored events take place; and
10. The program shall prepare candidates who understand and are able to accommodate the diverse learning styles of students.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.39 Engineering and Technology Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach Engineering and Technology Education in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the 2014 Standards for Technological Literacy as published by the International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA):
1. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the nature of technology within the context of the Designed World as part of Project 2061;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who understand technology and society with the context of the Designed World as part of Project 2061;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who understand design and the engineering and design process within the context of the Designed World as part of Project 2061;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who possess abilities for a technological world within the context of the Designed World as part of Project 2061;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the Designed World as part of Project 2061;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who design, implement, and evaluate curricula based upon Standards for Technological Literacy;
7. The program shall prepare candidates who use a variety of effective teaching practices that enhance and extend learning of engineering technology;
8. The program shall prepare candidates who design, create, and manage learning environments that promote technological literacy;
9. The program shall prepare candidates who understand students as learners, and how commonality and diversity affect learning;
10. The program shall prepare candidates who understand and value the importance of engaging in comprehensive and sustained professional growth to improve the teaching of engineering and technology;
11. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the organizational structure and historical development of career and technical education and its relationship to American business, industry, and careers;
12. The program shall prepare candidates who integrate academic and career and technical education content in the curriculum and in implementing interdisciplinary activities through project/problem - based learning;
13. The program shall prepare candidates who organize, manage, plan, and supervise the engineering and technology education classroom and lab;
14. The program shall prepare candidates who can adapt instruction for special needs students in engineering and technology programs;
15. The program shall prepare candidates who can interpret, develop, and implement curriculum for engineering and technology education programs, including instructional methods of teaching for the classroom and engineering and technology education lab activities;
16. The program shall prepare candidates who know and implement correct safety practices and procedures in the engineering and technology education lab;
17. The program shall prepare candidates who can facilitate co-curricular Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO's);
18. The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with elementary through secondary school guidance and counseling practices, assessment instruments and procedures, and assisting students in career development and placement activities through work-based learning experiences in the secondary schools; and
19. The program shall prepare candidates to work with business, industry, and labor in establishing school/business/community partnerships and advisory committees.
(b) The program shall have established procedures for evaluating and assessing work experience to determine eligibility for program.
(c) The program shall require professional field experience(s) sequenced over a period of time during the matriculation of the candidate. If the candidate is employed as a teacher, a structured, supervised field experience shall be provided in cooperation with the local unit of administration.
(d) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.40 Career and Technical Specializations Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states criteria for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach Career and Technical Specializations (CTS) in grades 6-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATIONPROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) Candidates shall meet eligibility criteria outlined in Rule 505-2-.90 in one of the following fields of Career and Technical Education (CTE):

Architectural Drawing and Design

Granite Technology

Audio/Video Technology and Film

Graphic Communication and Design

Automotive Service Technology

Information Technology

Aviation

Junior Reserve Officer's Training

Barbering

Corps (JROTC)

Collision Repair

Law, Public Safety, Corrections

Construction

and Security

Cosmetology

Engineering Technology

Culinary Arts

Manufacturing

Distribution and Logistics

Precision Machine Technology

Electronics Technology

Marine Engine Technology

Engineering Drafting and Design

Nails

Energy

Sheet Metal

Esthetics

Welding Technology

Government and Public Administration

  

(b) The program shall require demonstrated work experience in the field of eligibility and shall develop and consistently apply a clearly established procedure to evaluate and assess work experience.
(c) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall prepare candidates who interpret, develop, and implement curriculum for Career and Technical Specializations (CTS) programs, including instructional methods of teaching theory and laboratory activities;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the organizational structures and historical development of CTS education and its relationship to American business and industry;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who integrate academic and CTS content in the development of CTS curriculum, and in implementing interdisciplinary activities;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who organize, manage, plan, and supervise the school CTS laboratory;
5. The program shall prepare candidates who can adapt instruction for special needs students in CTS education programs;
6. The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with secondary school guidance and counseling practices, assessment instruments and procedures, and assisting students in career development.
7. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the value of Work Based Learning and can work collaboratively with the Work Based Learning Coordinator to assist in placement of students in their program area.
8. The program shall prepare candidates who apply computer applications in specific occupational areas of instruction;
9. The program shall prepare candidates who know and implement safety practices and procedures;
10. The program shall prepare candidates who can facilitate Career Technical Student (CTSOs) Organizations; and
11. The program shall prepare candidates who work with business, industry, and labor in establishing school/business partnerships and advisory committees.
(d) The program shall require professional field experience(s) sequenced over a period of time during the matriculation of the candidate. If the candidate is employed as a teacher, a structured, supervised field experience shall be provided in cooperation with the local unit of administration.
(e) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01.

Rule 505-3-.41 Computer Science Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach computer science in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program as described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi, based on the following standards adapted from standards for Computer Science Educators published in 2011 by the International Society for Technology Education (ISTE), and the Computer Science Teachers Association Interim Standards published in 2016:
Standard 1. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate computational thinking skills to formalize a problem and express its solution in a way that computers (human and machine) can effectively carry out as indicated by the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of and ability for applying computational thinking skills including decomposition, abstraction, and pattern recognition in problem solving;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate skills in devising algorithms for solving computational problems and checking for the correctness of the algorithms;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate understanding of limitations of computing; and
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who perform activities demonstrating applications of computational thinking skills.
Standard 2. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate proficiency in at least one third-generation programming language such as Java, Python, C, or C++, as indicated by the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of and skill regarding the syntax and semantics of a third-generation programming language, its control structures, and its data types;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of and skill regarding common abstraction mechanisms including functions, data structures, and application programming interfaces (APIs);
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of and skill in implementing algorithms into robust programs and testing and debugging these programs for correctness;
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who perform laboratory-based activities that demonstrate programming concepts proficiency in a third-generation programming language; and
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can document a program so that others can understand its design and implementation.
Standard 3. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate proficiency in basic computer system components and organization as indicated by the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of how data are represented on a computer including bits, bytes, words and binary, and both octal and hexadecimal number systems as well as conversions among them;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of main components of a computer system including CPU, OS, Memory, I/O devices, and peripherals;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of various types of storage options in a computing environment including hard drive, cloud storage, flash drives, DVDs; and
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how components of a computer system work together to produce programs and applications to solve computational problems.
Standard 4. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate proficiency in fundamental principles of computer networks and the Internet as indicated by the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of network components including hardware and software;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can explain how network topologies and protocols enable users, devices, and systems to communicate and collaborate with each other;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can examine the factors such as bandwidth, latency, and server capability that impact network functionality;
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can explain the abstractions in the Internet and how the Internet functions including the assignment of IP addresses, routing, the domain name system (DNS), and the use of protocols; and
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can explain the characteristics of the Internet and the systems built on it including redundancy, fault tolerance, hierarchy in IP addressing scheme, hierarchy in the DNS and open standards, and the influence of these characteristics on the systems.
Standard 5. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate proficiency in effectively and responsibly using computer applications to create digital artifacts, analyze data, model and simulate phenomena suggested by research and/or data as indicated by the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who can effectively use computer applications to create digital artifacts such as audio, video, animation, presentation, and websites;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can extract information from data to discover, explain, and visualize connections or trends;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can create models and simulations to help formulate, test and refine hypotheses;
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can form a model from a hypothesis generated from research and run a simulation to collect and analyze data to test that hypothesis; and
(v) The program shall prepare candidates to use industry best practices in application development.
Standard 6. The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate proficiency and understanding of security, privacy, and safety concerns in computer systems, networks, and applications as indicated by the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe main tenets of information security including confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, and nonrepudiation;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can explain fundamental design principles;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe types of threats and vulnerabilities to computer systems and the appropriate incident response and handling as well as imaging and backup procedures;
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe common network vulnerabilities (cyberattacks, identity theft, privacy) and their associated responses;
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can identify safe, secure, and ethical digital behavior; use effective strategies to evaluate the quality, credibility, and validity of websites; and understand the current and future implications of careless digital decisions;
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates to educate students on their role in the prevention of cyber-bullying and to take an active role in building positive online communities; and
(vii) The program shall prepare candidates to provide students with the ability to use effective search strategies to evaluate the quality, credibility, and validity of websites.
Standard 7. The program shall prepare candidates who plan, organize, deliver, and evaluate instruction that effectively utilizes current technology for teaching computational thinking principles, computer programming and its applications as indicated in the following:
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who identify resources, strategies, activities, and manipulatives appropriate to teaching computer science including related curricular areas, professional teacher and student organizations, and careers;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who know how to plan and implement instruction that allows students to use computer science in problem-solving and decision-making situations;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who know how to plan and implement instruction using a wide range of instructional strategies for individuals and groups for a diverse student population;
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who create and implement multiple forms of assessment and use resulting data to gauge student progress and adjust instruction accordingly;
(v) The program shall prepare candidates to prepare students for the emerging technologies and educate them to become responsible digital citizens with safe, secure, ethical and professional digital behavior; and
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates to positively impact the achievement and attainment of underrepresented populations by incorporating instructional strategies to increase their students' intentions to continue advanced studies in computer science.
Standard 8. The program shall prepare candidates who work with business and industry leaders in establishing school/business partnerships and advisory committees and operate student organizations as appropriate.

Rule 505-3-.42 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.43 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.44 Art Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach art in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the standards published by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (February 16, 2016):
1. The program shall prepare candidates who understand the processes of creating, presenting, responding and connecting to visual and media arts. Candidates should demonstrate basic expressive, technical, procedural and organizational skills and conceptual insights which can be developed through studio art and design experiences. Instruction should include traditional and contemporary art and design processes;
2. The program shall prepare candidates who have an understanding of (1) the major styles and periods of art history, analytical methods and theories of criticism; (2) the development of past and contemporary art forms; (3) the important process of artistic creation from initial idea to finished artwork. (4) contending philosophies of art; and (5) the relationship of all of these to making art;
3. The program shall prepare candidates who have created and presented advanced work in at least one or more studio art areas demonstrating technical mastery;
4. The program shall prepare candidates who have functional competence with principles of visual organization, including the ability to work with visual elements in two and three dimensions. The candidates shall have functional knowledge in such areas as the basic technologies involved in drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, media arts, ceramics and sculpture; and
5. The program shall prepare candidates who are able to connect an understanding of educational processes and structures with an understanding of relationships among the arts, sciences and humanities, in order to apply art competencies in teaching situations and to integrate art instruction into the total process of education. Specific competencies include:
a. An understanding of child development and the identification and understanding of psychological principles of learning as they relate to art education.
b. An understanding of the philosophical and social foundation underlying art in education and the ability to express a rationale for personal attitudes and beliefs.
c. Ability to assess aptitudes, experiential backgrounds, and interests of individuals and groups of students, and to devise learning experiences to meet assessed needs.
d. Knowledge of current methods and materials available in all fields and levels of art education.
e. Basic understanding of the principles and methods in art education of developing curricula and the short-and long term instructional units that comprise them.
f. The ability to accept, amend, or reject methods and materials based on personal assessment of specific teaching situations in art education.
g. An understanding of evaluative techniques in art education and the ability to apply them in assessing both the progress of students and the objectives and procedures of the curriculum.
h. Ability to organize continuing study and to incorporate knowledge gained into self-evaluation and professional growth.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.45 Dance Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule describes requirements and field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach dance in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01 Requirements and Standards for Approving Educator Preparation Providers and Educator Preparation Programs.
(2) Requirements. To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program as described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards based on the competencies published by the National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD) (2015):
1. Theoretical and Historical Studies. The Candidate will have comprehensive coursework in dance studies leading to knowledge of dance history, repertory, and ethnology, movement analysis; dance and movement sciences; and music production.
(i) Candidates will learn to analyze dance perceptively and evaluate it critically.
(ii) Candidates will develop working physical, verbal, and written vocabularies based on an understanding and interpretation of the common elements of dance and be able to employ this knowledge in analysis.
(iii) Candidates will be able to place dances in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts, and perceive dance as an evolving arts discipline.
(iv) Candidates will be able to form, articulate, and defend individual critiques, critical analyses, and evaluations about dance.
(v) Candidates shall have fundamental knowledge of the body, and understand the fundamentals of developmental kinesiology sufficiently to correlate student learning and development with age and physical motor skills.
2. Technique Study. The Candidate will have continuous and sequenced course-based instruction in technique, improvisation, composition, repertory, and individual performance competencies. Technique study and individual performance competencies will be continuous and sequential, and result in the attainment of an intermediate or advanced level comparable to proficiency required for the institution's non-certificate degree in at least two forms of technique.
(i) Candidates will develop a physical and conceptual understanding of movement and its expressive possibilities, including issues associated with student health and safety.
(ii) Candidates will have opportunities to experience and develop an appreciation and understanding of dance forms and styles from diverse cultures.
3. Choreography and Production. The Candidate will gain knowledge, skills, and dispositions through concentrated experience leading to proficiency in choreography and production through applied experiences.
(i) Candidates will develop and infuse elements of creativity, aesthetics, historical styles and current trends in choreography to include expressiveness, theatricality and technical interpretation.
(ii) Candidate will plan instruction which includes diverse choreographic perspectives, methods and processes.
(iii) As a competent choreographer, the candidate will be able to create expressive performances with various types of groups and in general classroom situations.
(iv) Program completion requirements must include two years of work in improvisation/composition; and choreography, performance, and production of original work.
4. Teaching Competencies. The candidate will be able to teach dance at various levels to different age groups and in a variety of classroom, studio, and ensemble settings that includes effective classroom, studio, and rehearsal management.
(i) Candidates will understand child growth and development and principles of learning as they relate to dance.
(ii) Candidates will be able to assess, adapt, and plan educational programs for the aptitudes, experiences, socio-cultural backgrounds, and orientations to meet the needs of all learners.
(iii) Candidates will be knowledgeable of current methods, materials, and repertories available in various fields and levels of dance education appropriate to the teaching specialization.
(iv) Candidates will understand and apply the principles and methods of developing curricula and the sequence of methods and units to comprise them.
(v) Candidates will understand assessment tools for formative and summative assessments.

Rule 505-3-.46 Theatre Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach theatre in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from National Association of Schools of Theatre standards published in August 2015.
1. Production
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate competence in basic acting skills and techniques;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can direct performances, including playwriting, analyzing scripts, blocking, and casting;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can produce theatre productions, including creating and using scenery, lights, hair and make-up, sound properties, costume, props, special effects, and multimedia;
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can evaluate and assess productions;
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the public relation aspect of theatre and that theatre is a business
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates who can promote and publicize activities or productions; and
(vii) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate technical skills for artistic self-expression in at least one major area of production (for example, acting, design/technology, playwriting, directing).
2. Repertory
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with theatre literature of various historical periods, cultural sources, modes of presentation; and
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who acquire experience with specific repertories through performance, academic study, and attendance at productions.
3. Theoretical and Historical Studies
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who understand theatre as a social and aesthetic experience.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who understand (a) contending philosophies of theatre, (b) the development of past and contemporary theatre forms, (c) major styles and periods of theatre history and dramatic literature, (d) theories of criticism, and (e) the fundamental and integral relationships of all these to the theatre performance.
4. Technology
(i) The program shall prepare candidates that have acquired a working knowledge of applicable technologies and equipment related to their area(s) of specialization in theatre education.
5. Synthesis
(i) The program shall prepare candidates with knowledge and the working application of the function of theatre in school and society, including content appropriateness and legal and ethical issues.

Rule 505-3-.47 English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval for an initial certification program in ESOL, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from the standards published in 2018 by the specialized professional association, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc.
1. Knowledge about Language: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language structures, English language use, and second language acquisition and development processes to help English Learners (ELs) acquire academic language and literacies specific to various content areas as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language structures (i.e., phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics) in different discourse contexts to promote the development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills across content areas. Candidates serve as language models for ELs;
(ii) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of second language acquisition theory and research pertaining to pedagogy and developmental processes of language acquisition to set achievable expectations for, facilitate, and monitor ELs' language learning; and
(iii) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English academic language functions (e.g., compare, describe, explain), content-specific language and discourse structures, and vocabulary to promote ELs' academic achievement across content areas.
2. Language and Culture: Candidates demonstrate and apply knowledge of the impact of dynamic academic, personal, familial, cultural, social, and sociopolitical contexts on the education and language acquisition of ELs as supported by research and theories. Candidates investigate the academic, cultural and personal characteristics of each EL, as well as family circumstances and literacy practices, to develop individualized, effective instructional and assessment practices for their ELs. Candidates recognize how educator identity, role, culture, race, gender, class and biases impact the interpretation of ELs' strengths and needs as indicated by:
(i) Candidates demonstrate pedagogical language knowledge and critical language awareness that can help understand and challenge the normative discourses and the ways in which dynamic academic, personal, familial, cultural, and social contexts, including sociopolitical factors, impact the education of ELs;
(ii) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of research and theories of cultural and linguistic diversity and equity that promote critical literacy and critical pedagogies, to support academic achievement and English language acquisition;
(iii) Candidates devise and implement methods and strategies to understand each ELs' academic characteristics, including background knowledge, educational history, English Language Proficiency (ELP) and current performance data, to develop effective, individualized instructional and assessment practices;
(iv) Candidates devise and implement methods to learn about personal characteristics of the individual ELs (e.g., interests, motivations, strengths, needs) and their family (e.g., language use, literacy practices, circumstances) to develop effective instructional practices; and
(v) Candidates use their own and ELs' multiple identities (e.g., professional, cultural, linguistic, multilingual, transnational etc.) as pedagogical resources to empower ELs, by describing their own personal biases, critical consciousness, and conscious knowledge of U.S. culture on their interpretation of the educational strengths and needs of ELs.
3. Planning and Implementing Instruction: Candidates plan supportive environments for ELs, design and implement standards-based instruction using evidence-based, EL-centered, interactive approaches. Candidates make instructional decisions by reflecting on individual EL outcomes and adjusting instruction. Candidates demonstrate understanding of the role of collaboration with colleagues and communication with families to support their ELs' acquisition of English language and literacies in the content areas. Candidates use and adapt relevant resources, including appropriate technology, to effectively plan, develop, implement, and communicate about instruction for ELs as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates plan for culturally and linguistically relevant, supportive environments that promote ELs' learning. Candidates design scaffolded instruction of language and literacies to support standards and curricular objectives for ELs' in the content areas;
(ii) Candidates instruct ELs using evidence-based, student-centered, developmentally appropriate interactive approaches;
(iii) Candidates adjust instructional decisions after critical reflection on individual ELs' learning outcomes in both language and content;
(iv) Candidates plan strategies to collaborate with other educators, school personnel, and families in order to support their ELs' learning of language and literacies in the content areas;
(v) Candidates use and adapt relevant materials and resources, including digital resources, to plan lessons for ELs, support communication with other educators, school personnel, and ELs and to foster student learning of language and literacies in the content areas; and
(vi) Candidates utilize WIDA Consortium English Language Development (ELD) standards and ELD assessment results aligned with the state-adopted content standards to effectively plan, develop, implement and communicate data-driven instruction for ELs.
4. Assessment and Evaluation: Candidates apply assessment principles to analyze and interpret multiple and varied assessments for ELs, including classroom-based, standardized, and language proficiency assessments. Candidates understand how to analyze and interpret data to make informed decisions that promote English language and content learning. Candidates understand the importance of communicating results to other educators, ELs, and ELs' families as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates apply knowledge of validity, reliability, and assessment purposes to analyze and interpret student data from multiple sources, including norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and authentic ongoing assessments. Candidates recognize biases in language testing and make informed instructional decisions that support language learning and assessment;
(ii) Candidates demonstrate understanding of classroom-based formative, summative, and diagnostic assessments scaffolded for both English language and content assessment.
(iii) Candidates continuously determine language and content learning goals based on assessment data;
(iv) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of state-approved administrative considerations, accessibility features, and accommodations appropriate to ELs for standardized and other assessments; and
(v) Candidates demonstrate understanding of how English language proficiency assessment results are used for identification, placement, and reclassification and communicate these results to other educators, EL's families, and other stakeholders.
5. Professionalism and Leadership: Candidates demonstrate professionalism and leadership by collaborating with other educators, knowing policies and legislation and the rights of ELs, advocating for ELs and their families, engaging in self-assessment and reflection, pursuing continuous professional development, and honing their teaching practice through supervised teaching as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of effective collaboration strategies in order to plan ways to serve as a resource for EL instruction, support educators and school staff, and advocate for ELs;
(ii) Candidates apply knowledge of school, district, and state policies as well as state and federal legislation that impact ELs educational rights in order to advocate for ELs;
(iii) Candidates practice self-assessment and reflection, make adjustments for self-improvement, and plan for continuous professional development in the field of English language learning and teaching; and
(iv) Candidates engage in supervised teaching of ELs to apply and develop their professional practice using self-reflection and feedback from their cooperating teacher(s) and supervising faculty.

Rule 505-3-.48 Foreign Language Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach foreign languages in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards published by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (2013):
1. Language Proficiency: Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who speak in the interpersonal mode of communication at a minimum level of "Advanced Low" or "Intermediate High: (for Arabic, Chinese, Japanese and Korean) on the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) according to the target language being taught.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who interpret oral, printed, and video texts by demonstrating both literal and figurative or symbolic comprehension.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who present oral and written information to audiences of listeners or readers, using language at a minimum level of "Advanced Low" or "intermediate High" according to the target language being taught.
2. Cultures, Linguistics, Literatures, and Concepts from Other Disciplines
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate target cultural understandings and compare cultures through perspectives, products and practices of those cultures.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate understanding of linguistics and the changing nature of language, and compare language systems.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate understanding of texts on literary and cultural themes as well as interdisciplinary topics.
3. Language Acquisition Theories and Knowledge of Students and Their Needs
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate an understanding of key principles of language acquisition and create linguistically and culturally rich learning environments.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate an understanding of child and adolescent development to create a supportive learning environment for each student.
4. Integration of Standards in Planning and Instruction
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate an understanding of the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century and their state standards and use them as the basis for instructional planning.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who integrate the goal areas of the Standards for Foreign Langue Learning in the 21st Century and their state standards in their classroom practice.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who use the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century and their state standards to select and integrate authentic texts, use technology, and adapt and crate instructional materials for use in communication.
5. Assessment of Language and Cultures-Impact on Student Learning
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who design and use ongoing authentic performance assessments using a variety of assessment models for all learners, including diverse students.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who reflect on and analyze the results of student assessments, adjust instructional accordingly and use data to inform and strengthen subsequent instruction.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who interpret and report the results of student performances to all stakeholders in the community, with particular emphasis on building student responsibility for their own learning.
6. Professional Development, Advocacy, and Ethics
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who engage in ongoing professional development opportunities that strengthen their own linguistic, cultural and pedagogical competence and promote reflection on practice.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who articulate the role and value of languages and cultures in preparing all students to interact in the global community of the 21st century through collaboration and advocacy.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who use inquiry and reflection to understand and explain the opportunities and responsibilities inherent in being a professional language educator and demonstrate a commitment to equitable and ethical interactions with all students, colleagues and other stakeholders.

Rule 505-3-.49 Health and Physical Education Program

(1) Purpose.This rule states field-specific content standards for approving initial educator preparation programs that prepare individuals to teach health and physical education in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards based on the standards published by published by National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) and American Association for Health Education (AAHE):
1. Professional Knowledge.
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who know and apply disciplinary-content knowledge and concepts critical to the development of healthy and physically educated individuals;
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply physiological and biomechanical concepts related to skillful movement, physical activity and fitness;
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply motor learning, psychological/behavioral theory related to skillful movement, physical activity, and fitness.
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply motor development theory and principles related to skillful movement, physical activity, and fitness.
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply historical, philosophical, and social perspectives of health and physical education issues and legislation;
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply critical elements of motor skills and performance concepts.
(vii) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply theoretical foundations of health behavior and principles of learning.
(viii) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply methods of assessing and promoting emotional, physical and mental health over the lifespan.
(ix) The program shall prepare candidates who can describe and apply knowledge of disease etiology and prevention practices.
(x) The program shall prepare candidates who can identify the role of health and physical education in the coordinated school health program.
2. Skill and Fitness Based Competence.
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who have the knowledge and skills necessary to demonstrate competent movement performance, health-enhancing fitness and health literacy skills.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate personal competence in motor skill performance for a variety of physical activities and movement patterns.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of fitness throughout the program.
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate appropriate application of performance concepts related to skillful movement in a variety of physical activities.
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate health literacy skills of an informed consumer using a variety of reliable data resources related to health.
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate ability to set goals, develop strategies and implement plans for maintaining and improving health.
3. Planning and Implementation.
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who can plan and implement a variety of developmentally appropriate learning experiences and content aligned with local, state and national standards in both health education and physical education.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can design and implement short and long-term plans that are linked to program and instructional goals as well as a variety of student needs.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can develop and implement appropriate (e.g., measurable, developmentally appropriate, performance based) goals and objectives aligned with local, state, and/or national standards.
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can design and implement content that is aligned with lesson objectives.
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can plan for and manage resources to provide active, fair, and equitable learning experiences.
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates who can plan and differentiate sequential instruction to accommodate learner capabilities and needs.
4. Instructional Delivery and Management.
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who can use effective communication and pedagogical skills and strategies to enhance student engagement and learning in both health education and physical education.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills across a variety of instructional formats.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can implement effective demonstrations, explanations, and instructional cues and prompts to link concepts to appropriate learning experiences.
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can analyze student performance and provide instructional feedback which results in skill acquisition, student learning, and motivation.
(v) The program shall prepare candidates who can recognize the changing dynamics of the environment and adjust instructional tasks based on student responses.
(vi) The program shall prepare candidates who can utilize managerial rules, routines, and transitions to create and maintain an effective learning environment.
(vii) The program shall prepare candidates who can implement strategies to help students demonstrate responsible personal and social behaviors.
5. Impact on Student Learning.
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who can utilize assessments and reflection to foster student learning and inform instructional decisions in both health education and physical education.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can select or create appropriate assessments that will measure student achievement of goals and objectives.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can use a variety of appropriate assessments to evaluate student learning.
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can utilize the reflective cycle to implement change in teacher performance, student learning, and/or instructional goals and decisions.
6. Professionalism.
(i) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate dispositions essential to becoming effective professionals in both health education and physical education.
(ii) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate behaviors that are consistent with the belief that all students can become healthy and physically educated individuals.
(iii) The program shall prepare candidates who can participate in activities that enhance collaboration and lead to continuous professional learning.
(iv) The program shall prepare candidates who can model appropriate professional behaviors.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.50 Music Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to teach music in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards based on the competencies published by the National Association of Schools of Music (2015):
1. Performance
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in at least one major performance area at a level appropriate for the particular music concentration. Experiences in additional performance areas are recommended.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess an overview understanding of the repertory in their major performance area and the ability to perform from a cross section of that repertory.
(iii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess the ability to read at sight with fluency.
(iv) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader and in collaboration on matters of musical interpretation. Rehearsal and conducting skills are required as appropriate to the particular music concentration.
(v) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess keyboard competency. Providing opportunities for candidates to gain guitar competency in addition to keyboard competency, while not required, is highly recommended.
(vi) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess growth in artistry, technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory through regular ensemble experiences. Ensembles should be varied both in size and nature.
2. Aural Skills and Analysis
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess an understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interactions, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses and the ability to take aural dictation.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess sufficient understanding of musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge in compositional, performance, scholarly, pedagogical, and historical contexts, according to the requisites of their specializations.
(iii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess the ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts.
3. Composition and Improvisation
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess a rudimentary capacity to create derivative or original music both extemporaneously and in written form.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess the ability to compose, improvise, or both at a basic level in one or more musical languages. These may include, but are not limited to, the creation of original compositions or improvisations, variations or improvisations on existing materials, experimentation with various sound sources including digital/electronic the imitation of various musical styles, and manipulation of the common elements in non-traditional ways.
4. History and Repertory
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess a basic knowledge of music history through the present time.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess an acquaintance with repertories beyond the area of specialization. All students must be exposed to a large and varied body of music through study and attendance at recitals, concerts, opera and musical theater productions, and other performances.
5. Technology
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess a basic overview understanding of how technology serves the field of music as a whole. These may include, but are not limited to, digital recording, sound engineering and music production.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who possess a working knowledge of the technological developments applicable to their area of specialization.
6. Synthesis
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who work independently on a variety of music problems by combining their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal and visual analysis; composition and improvisation; and repertory and history.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who form and define value judgments about music.
(iii) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the tools to work with a comprehensive repertory, including music from various cultures of the world and music of their own time.
(iv) Programs shall prepare candidates who understand basic interrelationships and interdependencies among various professions and activities that constitute the music enterprise.
7. Music Competencies for Teachers
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who are competent conductors, able to create accurate and musically expressive performances with various types of performing groups and in general classroom situations.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who are able to arrange and adapt music from a variety of sources to meet the needs and ability levels of school performing groups and classroom situations.
(iii) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate functional performance abilities in keyboard and voice, as well as in instruments appropriate to the candidate's teaching specialization.
(iv) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the ability to apply analytical and historical knowledge to curriculum development, lesson planning, and daily classroom and performance activities.
8. Teaching Competencies for Teachers
(i) Programs shall prepare candidates who teach music at various levels to different age groups and in a variety of classroom and ensemble settings in ways that develop knowledge of how music works syntactically as a communication medium and developmentally as an agent of civilization. This competency includes effective classroom and rehearsal management.
(ii) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate an understanding of child growth and development and an understanding of principles of learning as they relate to music.
(iii) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the ability to assess aptitudes, experiential backgrounds, orientations of individuals and groups of students, and the nature of subject matter, and to plan educational programs to meet assessed needs.
(iv) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate knowledge of current methods, materials, and repertories available in all fields and levels of music education.
(v) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate the ability to accept, amend, or reject methods and materials based on personal assessment of specific teaching situations.
(vi) Programs shall prepare candidates who demonstrate an understanding of evaluative techniques and ability to apply them in assessing both the musical progress of students and the objectives and procedures of the curriculum.
9. Field Experiences/Clinical Practices
(1) Programs shall prepare candidates who complete field experiences or clinical practices in choral, instrumental and general music.
(b) The program shall meet all requirements specified in Rule 505-3-.01, REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR APPROVING EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS.

Rule 505-3-.51 Reading Education Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare individuals to serve as teachers of reading and related literacy topics in grades P-12 and supplements requirements in Rule 505-3-.01 Requirements and Standards for Approving Educator preparation providers and Educator Preparation Programs. Reading Education programs will be classified as teaching field programs and may be offered for initial certification in the field at the Master's degree level or higher, or as a certification-only program for those holding advanced degrees. Programs leading to initial certification in the field, regardless of degree level, must be approved by the GaPSC.
(2) Admission Requirements.
(a) A valid, level 4 or higher Induction, Professional, Advanced Professional, or Lead Professional teaching certificate is required for program admission.
(3) Program Standards and Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, GaPSC-approved educator preparation providers shall offer a preparation program at the Master's degree or higher level described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards adapted from those published by the International Literacy Association (2017):
1. Foundational Knowledge.Candidates demonstrate knowledge of major theoretical, conceptual, historical, and evidence-based foundations of literacy and language, and the ways in which they interrelate as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the major theoretical, conceptual, historical, and evidence-based components of reading development (e.g., concepts of print, phonological awareness, phonics, word recognition, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension) throughout the grades and their relationship with other aspects of literacy;
(ii) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the major theoretical, conceptual, historical, and evidence-based aspects of writing development, writing processes (e.g., revising, audience), and foundational skills (e.g., spelling, sentence construction, word processing) and their relationships with other aspects of literacy; and
(iii) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of theoretical, conceptual, historical, and evidence-based components of language (e.g., language acquisition, structure of language, conventions of standard English, vocabulary acquisition and use, speaking, listening, viewing, visually representing) and its relationships with other aspects of literacy.
2. Curriculum and Instruction. Candidates use foundational knowledge to design literacy curricula to meet the needs of learners, especially those who experience difficulty with literacy; design, implement, and evaluate small-group and individual evidence-based literacy instruction for learners; and collaborate with other teachers to implement effective literacy practices as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates use foundational knowledge to design, select, critique, adapt, and evaluate evidence-based literacy curricula that meet the needs of all learners;
(ii) Candidates design, select, adapt, teach and evaluate evidence-based instructional approaches, using both informational and narrative texts, to meet the literacy needs of whole class and groups of students in the academic disciplines and other subject areas, and when learning to read, write, listen, speak, view or visually represent;
(iii) Candidates select, adapt, teach, and evaluate evidence-based supplemental and intervention approaches and programs, and such instruction is explicit, intense, and provides adequate scaffolding to meet the literacy needs of individual and small groups of students, especially those who experience difficulty with reading and writing; and
(iv) Candidates collaborate with school-based educators in developing, implementing, and evaluating literacy instructional practices and curriculum.
3. Assessment and Evaluation. Candidates understand, select, and use valid, reliable, fair, and appropriate assessment tools to screen, diagnose, and measure student literacy achievement; inform instruction and evaluate interventions; assist other teachers in their understanding and use of assessment results; and advocate for appropriate literacy practices to relevant stakeholders as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates understand the purposes, attributes, formats, strengths/limitations (including validity, reliability, inherent language, dialect, cultural bias), and influences of various types of tools in a comprehensive literacy and language assessment system, and apply that knowledge to using assessment tools;
(ii) Candidates collaborate with colleagues to administer, interpret, and use data for decision making about student assessment, instruction, intervention, and evaluation for individual and groups of students;
(iii) Candidates participate in and lead professional learning experiences to assist other teachers in selecting, administering, analyzing, interpreting assessments, and using results for instructional decision making in classrooms and schools; and
(iv) Candidates, using both written and oral communication, explain assessment results, and advocate for appropriate literacy and language practices to a variety of stakeholders, including students, administrators, teachers, other educators, and parents/guardians.
4. Diversity and Equity. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of research, relevant theories, pedagogies, and essential concepts of diversity and equity; demonstrate an understanding of themselves and others as cultural beings; create classrooms and schools that are inclusive and affirming; and advocate for equity at school, district, and community levels as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates demonstrate knowledge of foundational theories about diverse learners, equity, and culturally responsive instruction;
(ii) Candidates demonstrate understanding of themselves and others as cultural beings through their pedagogy and interactions with individuals both within and outside of the school community;
(iii) Candidates create and advocate for inclusive and affirming classroom and school environments by designing and implementing instruction that is culturally responsive and acknowledges and values the diversity in their school and in society; and
(iv) Candidates advocate for equity at school, district, and community levels.
5. Learners and the Literacy Environment. Candidates meet the developmental needs of all learners and collaborate with school personnel to use a variety of print and digital materials to engage and motivate all learners; integrate digital technologies in appropriate, safe, and effective ways; and foster a positive climate that supports a literacy-rich learning environment as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates, in consultation with families and colleagues, meet the developmental needs of all learners (e.g., English learners, those with difficulties learning to read, the gifted), taking into consideration physical, social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual factors;
(ii) Candidates provide opportunities for student choice and engagement with a variety of print and digital materials to engage and motivate all learners;
(iii) Candidates integrate digital technologies into their literacy instruction in appropriate, safe, and effective ways and assist colleagues in these efforts; and
(iv) Candidates facilitate efforts to foster a positive climate that supports the physical and social literacy-rich learning environment, including knowledge of routines, grouping structures, and social interactions.
6. Professional Learning and Leadership. Candidates demonstrate the ability to be reflective literacy professionals, who apply their knowledge of adult learning to work collaboratively with colleagues; demonstrate their leadership and facilitation skills; and advocate on behalf of teachers, students, families, and communities as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates reflect on their professional practices, belong to professional organizations, and are critical consumers of research, policy, and practice;
(ii) Candidates use their knowledge of adult learning to engage in collaborative decision making with colleagues to design, align, and assess instructional practices and interventions within and across classrooms;
(iii) Candidates develop, refine, and demonstrate leadership and facilitation skills when working with individuals and groups; and
(iv) Candidates consult with and advocate on behalf of teachers, students, families, and communities for effective literacy practices and policies.
7. Practicum/Clinical Experiences. Candidates complete supervised, integrated, extended practice/clinical experiences that include intervention work with students and working with their peers and experienced colleagues; practice includes ongoing experiences in school-based setting(s); and supervision includes observation and ongoing feedback by qualified supervisors as indicated by the following:
(i) Candidates work with individual and small groups of students at various grade levels to assess students' literacy strengths and needs, develop literacy intervention plans, implement instructional plans, create supportive literacy learning environments, and assess impact on student learning. Settings may include a candidate's own classroom, literacy clinic, other school, or community settings;
(ii) Candidates collaborate with and coach peers and experienced colleagues to develop, reflect on, and study their own and others' teaching practices;
(iii) Candidates have ongoing opportunities for authentic, school-based practicum experiences; and
(iv) Candidates receive supervision, including observation (in-person, computer assisted, or video analysis) and ongoing feedback during their practicum/clinical experiences by supervisors who understand literacy processes, have literacy content knowledge, understand literacy assessment and evidence-based instructional strategies, and, preferably, have experience as reading/literacy specialists.

Rule 505-3-.52 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.53 Repealed and Reserved

Rule 505-3-.54 Special Education Adapted Curriculum Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare teachers to teach all students P-12 with disabilities whose individual education program indicates instruction in an adapted curriculum leading to participation in the Georgia alternate assessment. This rule supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, Requirements and Standards for Approving EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS and Educator Preparation Programs.
(2) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall conform to the following standards for the preparation of all beginning special education teachers of students in Individualized Independence Curriculum published by the Council for Exceptional Children 2012.
(i) Learner and Learning: Learner Development and Individual Learning Differences

Beginning special education professionals understand how exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities. They understand how language, culture, and family background influence the learning of individuals with exceptionalities and use understanding of development and individual differences to respond to the needs of individuals with exceptionalities.

The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand typical and atypical human growth and development;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand similarities and differences among individuals with exceptionalities;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand educational implications of characteristics of various exceptionalities;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand family systems and the role of families in supporting development;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with cultural perspectives influencing the relationships among families, schools, and communities as related to instruction;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand variations in beliefs, traditions, and values across and within cultures and their effects on relationships among individuals with exceptionalities, family, and schooling;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand characteristics and effects of the cultural and environmental milieu of the individual with exceptionalities and the family;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand similarities and differences of individuals with and without exceptionalities;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand effects of various medications on individuals with exceptionalities;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the effects an exceptional condition(s) can have on an individual's life;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of individuals with exceptionalities' academic and social abilities, attitudes, interests, and values on instruction and career development;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate differing ways of learning of individuals with exceptionalities, including those from culturally diverse backgrounds, and strategies for addressing these differences;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate the effects of cultural and linguistic differences on growth and development;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the characteristics of one's own culture and use of language and the ways in which these can differ from other cultures and uses of languages;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand ways of behaving and communicating among cultures that can lead to misinterpretation and misunderstanding;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand etiology and diagnosis related to various theoretical approaches;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of sensory impairments and physical and health exceptionalities on individuals, families, and society;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand etiologies and medical aspects of conditions affecting individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand psychological and social-emotional characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand types and transmission routes of infectious disease;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand complications and implications of medical support services;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of exceptionalities on auditory and information processing skills;
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of multiple disabilities on behavior;
(XXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of language development and listening comprehension on academic and non-academic learning of individuals with exceptionalities; and
(XXV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the communication and social interaction alternatives for individuals who are nonspeaking.
(ii) Learning Environments

Beginning special education professionals create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination. They collaborate with general educators and other colleagues to create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage individuals with exceptionalities in meaningful learning activities and social interactions. Beginning special education professionals use motivational and instructional interventions to teach individuals with exceptionalities how to adapt to different environments. They know how to intervene safely and appropriately with individuals with exceptionalities. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the demands of learning environments;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand basic classroom management theories and strategies for individuals with exceptionalities;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand effective management of teaching and learning;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand teacher attitudes and behaviors that influence behavior of individuals with exceptionalities;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who understand social skills needed for educational and other environments;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of strategies for crisis prevention and intervention;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of strategies for preparing individuals to live harmoniously and productively in a culturally diverse world;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand ways to create learning environments that allow individuals to retain and appreciate their own and each other's respective language and cultural heritage;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand ways cultures are negatively stereotyped;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who understand strategies used by diverse populations to cope with a legacy of former and continuing racism;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand specialized health care interventions for individuals with physical and health exceptionalities in educational settings;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand barriers to accessibility and acceptance of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand adaptation of the physical environment to provide optimal learning opportunities for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand methods for ensuring individual academic success in one-to-one, small-group and large-group settings;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the advantages and disadvantages of placement options and programs on the continuum of services for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who create a safe, equitable, positive, and supportive learning environment in which diversities are valued;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who identify realistic expectations for personal and social behavior in various settings;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who identify supports needed for integration into various program placements;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who design learning environments that encourage active participation in individual and group activities;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who modify the learning environment to manage behaviors;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who use performance data and information from all stakeholders to make or suggest modifications in learning environments;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who establish and maintain rapport with individuals with and without exceptionalities;
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who teach self-advocacy;
(XXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who create an environment that encourages self-advocacy and increased independence;
(XXV) The program shall prepare candidates who use effective and varied behavior management strategies;
(XXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who use the least intensive behavior management strategy consistent with the needs of the individual with exceptionalities;
(XXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who design and manage daily routines;
(XXVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who organize, develop, and sustain learning environments that support positive intra-cultural and intercultural experiences;
(XXIX) The program shall prepare candidates who mediate controversial intercultural issues among individuals with exceptionalities within the learning environment in ways that enhance any culture, group, or person;
(XXX) The program shall prepare candidates who structure, direct, and support the activities of Para-educators, volunteers, and tutors;
(XXXI) The program shall prepare candidates who use universal precautions;
(XXXII) The program shall prepare candidates who provide instruction in community-based settings;
(XXXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who use and maintain assistive technologies;
(XXXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who structure the educational environment to provide optimal learning opportunities for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXXV) The program shall prepare candidates who plan instruction in a variety of educational settings;
(XXXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who teach individuals with exceptionalities to give and receive meaningful feedback from peers and adults;
(XXXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who design learning environments that are multisensory and that facilitate active participation, self-advocacy, and independence of individuals with exceptionalities in a variety of group and individual learning activities;
(XXXVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who use techniques of physical positioning and management of individuals with exceptionalities to ensure participation in academic and social environments;
(XXXIX) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate appropriate body mechanics to ensure student and teacher safety in transfer, lifting positioning and seating;
(XL) The program shall prepare candidates who use positioning techniques that decrease inappropriate tone and facilitate appropriate postural reactions to enhance participation;
(XLI) The program shall prepare candidates who use skills in problem-solving and conflict resolution;
(XLII) The program shall prepare candidates who design and implement sensory stimulation programs; and
(XLIII) The program shall prepare candidates who plan instruction for independent functional life skills relevant to the community, personal living, sexuality and employment.
(iii) Curricular Content Knowledge

Beginning special education professionals use knowledge of general and specialized curricula to individualize learning for individuals with exceptionalities. They understand the central concepts, structures of the discipline and tools of inquiry of the content areas they teach and can organize this knowledge, integrate cross-disciplinary skills and develop meaningful learning progressions for individuals with exceptionalities. Beginning special education professionals understand and use general and specialized content knowledge for teaching across curricular content areas to individualize learning for individuals with exceptionalities and can modify general and specialized curricula to make them accessible to individuals with exceptionalities. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand theories and research that form the basis of curriculum development and instructional practices;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand scope and sequences of general and special curricula;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand national, state or provincial, and local curricula standards;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand technology for planning and managing the teaching and learning environment;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who identify and prioritize areas of the general curriculum and accommodations for individuals with exceptionalities; and
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who integrate affective, social, and life skills with academic curricula.
(iv) Assessment

Beginning special education professionals use multiple methods of assessment and data-sources in making educational decisions. They select and use technically sound formal and informal assessments that minimize bias and use knowledge of measurement principles and practices to interpret assessment results and guide educational decisions for individuals with exceptionalities. Beginning special education professionals in collaboration with colleagues and families use multiple types of assessment information in making decisions about individuals with exceptionalities. They engage individuals with exceptionalities to work toward quality learning and performance and provide feedback to guide them. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand basic terminology used in assessment;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand legal provisions and ethical principles regarding assessment of individuals;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand screening, pre-referral, referral, and classification procedures;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the use and limitations of assessment instruments;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who understand national, state or provincial, and local accommodations and modifications;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand specialized terminology used in the assessment of individuals with exceptionalities;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand laws and policies regarding referral and placement procedures for individuals with exceptionalities;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the types and importance of information concerning individuals with exceptionalities available from families and public agencies;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who gather relevant background information;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who administer nonbiased formal and informal assessments;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who use technology to conduct assessments;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who develop or modify individualized assessment strategies;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who interpret information from formal and informal assessments;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who use assessment information in making eligibility, program and placement decisions for individuals with exceptionalities, including those from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who report assessment results to all stakeholders using effective communication skills;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who evaluate instruction and monitor progress of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who create and maintain records;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who implement procedures for assessing and reporting both appropriate and problematic social behaviors of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who use exceptionality-specific assessment instruments with individuals with exceptionalities;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who select, adapt and modify assessments to accommodate the unique abilities and needs of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who develop and use a technology plan based on adaptive technology and assessment;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who assess reliable methods of response of individuals who lack typical communication and performance abilities; and
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who monitor intragroup behavior changes across subjects and activities.
(v) Instructional Planning and Strategies

Beginning special education professionals select, adapt, and use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of individuals with exceptionalities. They consider an individual's abilities, interests, learning environments, and cultural and linguistic factors in the selection, development, and adaptation of learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities. Beginning special education professionals use technologies to support instructional assessment, planning, and delivery for individuals with exceptionalities. They are familiar with augmentative and alternative communication systems and a variety of assistive technologies to support the communication and learning of individuals with exceptionalities. They use strategies to enhance language development and communication skills of individuals with exceptionalities, develop and implement a variety of education and transition plans for individuals with exceptionalities across a wide range of settings and different learning experiences in collaboration with individuals, families and teams, and teach to mastery and promote generalization of learning. They teach cross-disciplinary knowledge and skills such as critical thinking and problem solving to individuals with exceptionalities. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of the roles and responsibilities of the Para-educator related to instruction, intervention, and direct service;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who know and apply evidence-based practices validated for specific characteristics of learners and settings;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who know augmentative and assistive communication strategies;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of sources of specialized materials, curricula, and resources for individuals with exceptionalities;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who understand prevention and intervention strategies for individuals at-risk for a disability;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate strategies for integrating student initiated learning experiences into ongoing instruction;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who can identify resources and techniques used to transition individuals with exceptionalities into and out of school and post school;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who model career, vocational, and transition programs for individuals with exceptionalities;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who develop and implement comprehensive, longitudinal individualized programs in collaboration with team members;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who involve the individual and family in setting instructional goals and monitoring progress;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who use functional assessments to develop intervention plans;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who use task analysis;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who sequence, implement, and evaluate individualized learning objectives;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who develop and select instructional content, resources, and strategies that respond to cultural, linguistic, and gender differences;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who incorporate and implement instructional and assistive technology into the educational program;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who prepare lesson plans;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who prepare and organize materials to implement daily lesson plans;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who use instructional time effectively;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who make adjustments to instruction based on continual observations;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who prepare individuals to exhibit self-enhancing behavior in response to societal attitudes and actions;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who use strategies to facilitate integration into various settings;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who teach individuals to use self-assessment, problem-solving, and other cognitive strategies to meet their needs;
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who select, adapt, and use instructional strategies and materials according to characteristics of the individual with exceptionalities;
(XXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who use strategies to facilitate maintenance and generalization of skills across learning environments;
(XXV) The program shall prepare candidates who use procedures to increase the individual's self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem;
(XXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who use strategies that promote successful transitions for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who use strategies to support and enhance communication skills of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who use communication strategies and resources to facilitate understanding of subject matter for individuals with exceptionalities whose primary language is not the dominant language;
(XXIX) The program shall prepare candidates who modify instructional practices in response to ongoing assessment data;
(XXX) The program shall prepare candidates who can relate levels of support to the needs of the individual;
(XXXI) The program shall prepare candidates who use research-supported methods for academic and nonacademic instruction of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXXII) The program shall prepare candidates who use appropriate adaptations and technology for all individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who use a variety of non-aversive techniques to control targeted behavior and maintain attention of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who identify and teach basic structures and relationships within and across curricula;
(XXXV) The program shall prepare candidates who use instructional methods to strengthen and compensate for deficits in perception, comprehension, memory and retrieval;
(XXXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who use responses and errors to guide instructional decisions and provide feedback to learners;
(XXXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who teach individuals with exceptionalities to monitor for errors in oral and written language;
(XXXVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who teach methods and strategies for producing legible documents;
(XXXIX) The program shall prepare candidates who plan instruction on the use of alternative and augmentative communication systems;
(XL) The program shall prepare candidates who plan and implement individualized reinforcement systems and environmental modifications;
(XLI) The program shall prepare candidates who plan and implement age- and ability-appropriate instruction for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XLII) The program shall prepare candidates who select and plan for integration of related services into the instructional plan;
(XLIII) The program shall prepare candidates who can select, design and use medical materials and resources required to educate individuals whose exceptionalities interfere with communications;
(XLIV) The program shall prepare candidates who interpret sensory, mobility, reflex, and perceptual information to create or adapt appropriate learning plans;
(XLV) The program shall prepare candidates who design and implement instructional programs that address independent living and career education for individuals;
(XLVI) The program shall prepare candidates who design and implement curriculum and instructional strategies for medical self-management procedures; and
(XLVII) The program shall prepare candidates who design, implement, and evaluate instructional programs that enhance social participation across environments.
(vi) Professional Learning and Ethical Practice

Beginning special education professionals use foundational knowledge of the field and their professional Ethical Principles and Practice Standards to inform special education practice, to engage in lifelong learning and to advance the profession. They use Ethical Principles and Professional Practice Standards to guide their practice and understand how foundational knowledge and current issues influence professional practice. They understand that diversity is a part of families, cultures, and schools, and that complex human issues can interact with the delivery of special education services. Beginning special education professionals understand the significance of lifelong learning and participate in professional activities and learning communities. They advance the profession by engaging in activities such as advocacy and mentoring and provide guidance and direction to Para-educators, tutors, and volunteers. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand models, theories, philosophies, and research methods that form the basis for special education practice;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand laws, policies and ethical principles regarding behavior management, planning and implementation;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the relationship of special education to the organization and function of educational agencies;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the rights and responsibilities of individuals with exceptionalities, parents, teachers, and other professionals, and schools related to exceptionalities;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who understand issues in definition and identification of individuals with exceptionalities, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand issues, assurances and due process rights related to assessment, eligibility, and placement within a continuum of services;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand family systems and the role of families in the educational process;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand historical points of view and contributions of culturally diverse groups;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of the dominant culture on shaping schools and the individuals who study and work in them;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the potential impact of differences in values, languages, and customs that can exist between the home and school;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand personal cultural biases and differences that affect one's teaching;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the importance of the teacher serving as a model for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the continuum of lifelong professional development;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand methods to remain current regarding research-validated practice;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the definitions and issues related to the identification of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand historical foundations, classic studies, major contributors, major legislation, and current issues related to knowledge and practice;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the legal, judicial, and educational systems to assist individuals with exceptionalities;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the continuum of placement and services available for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand laws and policies related to provision of specialized health care in educational settings;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand principles of normalization and concept of least restrictive environment;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the theory of reinforcement techniques in serving individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the models and theories of deviance and behavior programs;
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand sources of unique services, networks, and organizations for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand organizations and publications relevant to individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXV) The program shall prepare candidates who practice within the CEC Code of Ethics and other standards of the profession;
(XXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who uphold high standards of competence and integrity and exercise sound judgment in the practice of the profession;
(XXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who act ethically in advocating for appropriate services;
(XXVIII) The program shall conduct professional activities in compliance with applicable laws and policies;
(XXIX) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate commitment to developing the highest education and quality-of-life potential of individuals with exceptional learning needs;
(XXX) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate sensitivity for the culture, language, religion, gender, disability, socio-economic status, and sexual orientation of individuals;
(XXXI) The program shall prepare candidates who practice within their skill limit and obtain assistance as needed;
(XXXII) The program shall prepare candidates who use verbal, nonverbal, and written language effectively;
(XXXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who conduct self-evaluation of instruction;
(XXXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who access information on exceptionalities;
(XXXV) The program shall prepare candidates who reflect on one's practice to improve instruction and guide professional growth;
(XXXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who engage in professional activities that benefit individuals with exceptionalities, their families, and one's colleagues;
(XXXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who demonstrate commitment to engage in evidence-based practices;
(XXXVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who articulate personal philosophies of special education;
(XXXIX) The program shall prepare candidates who participate in the activities of professional organizations relevant to individuals with exceptionalities;
(XL) The program shall prepare candidates who consider it their ethical responsibility to advocate for appropriate services for individuals with exceptionalities; and
(XLI) The program shall prepare candidates who seek information regarding protocols, procedural guidelines, and policies designed to assist individuals with exceptionalities as they participate in school and community-based activities.
(vii) Collaboration

Beginning special education professionals collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with exceptionalities, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences. They use the theory and elements of effective collaboration, serve as a collaborative resource to colleagues and use collaboration to promote the well-being of individuals with exceptionalities across a wide range of settings and collaborators. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who know models and strategies of consultation and collaboration;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who know the roles of individuals with exceptional learning needs, families, and school and community personnel in the planning of an individualized program;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the concerns of families of individuals with exceptional learning needs and strategies to help address these concerns;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who know culturally responsive factors that promote effective communication and collaboration with individuals with exceptional learning needs, families, school personnel, and community members;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who provide parent education programs and behavior management guides that address severe behavior problems and facilitation of communication for individuals with exceptionalities;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the collaborative and/or consultative role for the special education teacher in the reintegration of individuals with exceptionalities;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the roles of professional groups and referral agencies in identifying, assessing, and providing services to individuals with exceptionalities;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who maintain confidential communication about individuals with exceptional learning needs;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who collaborate with families and others in the assessment of individuals with exceptional learning needs;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who foster respectful and beneficial relationships between families and professionals;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who assist individuals with exceptionalities and their families in becoming active participants in the educational team;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who plan and conduct collaborative conferences with individuals with exceptionalities and their families;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who collaborate with school personnel and community members in integrating individuals with exceptional learning needs into various settings;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who use group problem solving skills to develop, implement and evaluate collaborative activities;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who model techniques and coach others in the use of instructional methods and accommodations;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who communicate with school personnel about the characteristics and needs of individuals with exceptional learning needs;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who communicate effectively with families of individuals with exceptional learning needs from diverse backgrounds;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who observe, evaluate and provide feedback to Para-educators;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who participate in the selection and implementation of augmentative or alternative communication systems;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who use local community and state and provincial resources to assist in programming with individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who select, plan, and coordinate activities of related services' personnel to maximize direct instruction for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who teach parents to use appropriate behavior management and counseling techniques; and
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who collaborate with team members to plan transition to adulthood that encourages full community participation.
(b) The program shall prepare professionals who understand and apply principles of teaching reading and writing and who meet the following identified standards specified by the International Reading Association Standards for Reading Professionals, Classroom Teacher Candidate, 2011. This requirement may be met in a separate three (3) semester-hour course, or content may be embedded in courses and experiences throughout the preparation program.
1. Candidates use instructional approaches, materials, and an integrated, comprehensive, balanced curriculum to support student learning in reading and writing.
2. Candidates use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing instruction.
3. Candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.
(c) The program shall require the completion of a content concentration in social science, science, math, language arts, or reading.
1. A content concentration shall consist of fifteen (15) semester hours of academic content that conforms with the requirements of the content concentrations for middle grades. (See Rule 505-3-.19, MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION PROGRAM.)
2. A course taken to meet the requirements of (b) (above) may be counted toward the fifteen semester hours required for the reading concentration.
3. A course taken to meet the requirements of (b) (above) may be counted toward the fifteen semester hours required for the language arts concentration.

Rule 505-3-.55 Special Education General Curriculum Program

(1) Purpose. This rule states field-specific content standards for approving programs that prepare teachers to teach all students P-12 with disabilities whose individual education program indicates instruction using the general education curriculum and participation in the general statewide assessment. This rule supplements requirements in GaPSC Rule 505-3-.01, Requirements and Standards for Approving EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROVIDERS AND Educator Preparation Programs.
(1) Requirements.
(a) To receive approval, a GaPSC-approved educator preparation provider shall offer a preparation program described in program planning forms, catalogs, and syllabi addressing the following standards:
1. The program shall conform to the following standards for the preparation of all beginning special education teachers published by the Council for Exceptional Children 2012 as follows:
(i) Learner and Learning: Learner Development and Individual Learning Differences

Beginning special education professionals understand how exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities. They understand how language, culture, and family background influence the learning of individuals with exceptionalities and use understanding of development and individual differences to respond to the needs of individuals with exceptionalities. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand typical and atypical human growth and development;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand similarities and differences among individuals with exceptionalities;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand educational implications of characteristics of various exceptionalities;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand family systems and the role of families in supporting development;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who are familiar with cultural perspectives influencing the relationships among families, schools, and communities as related to instruction;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand variations in beliefs, traditions, and values across and within cultures and their effects on relationships among individuals with exceptionalities, family, and schooling;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand characteristics and effects of the cultural and environmental milieu of the individual with exceptionalities and the family;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand similarities and differences of individuals with and without exceptionalities;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand effects of various medications on individuals with exceptionalities;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the effects an exceptional condition(s) can have on an individual's life;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of individuals with exceptionalities' academic and social abilities, attitudes, interests, and values on instruction and career development;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate differing ways of learning of individuals with exceptionalities, including those from culturally diverse backgrounds and strategies for addressing these differences;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who can demonstrate the effects of cultural and linguistic differences on growth and development;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the characteristics of one's own culture and use of language and the ways in which these can differ from other cultures and uses of languages;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand ways of behaving and communicating among cultures that can lead to misinterpretation and misunderstanding;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand etiology and diagnosis related to various theoretical approaches;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of sensory impairments, physical and health exceptionalities on individuals, families, and society;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand etiologies and medical aspects of conditions affecting individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand psychological and social-emotional characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand common etiologies and the impact of sensory exceptionalities on learning and experience;
(XXI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand types and transmission routes of infectious disease;
(XXII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand complications and implications of medical support services;
(XXIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of exceptionalities on auditory and information processing skills;
(XXIV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of multiple disabilities on behavior;
(XXV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the impact of language development and listening comprehension on academic and non-academic learning of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XXVI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the communication and social interaction alternatives for individuals who are nonspeaking;
(XXVII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand typical language development and how that may differ for individuals with learning exceptionalities; and
(XXVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who are skilled in relating levels of support to the needs of the individual.
(ii) Learning Environments

Beginning special education professionals create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination. They collaborate with general educators and other colleagues to create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage individuals with exceptionalities in meaningful learning activities and social interactions. Beginning special education professionals use motivational and instructional interventions to teach individuals with exceptionalities how to adapt to different environments. They know how to intervene safely and appropriately with individuals with exceptionalities. The standard and elements will be indicated by the following:

(I) The program shall prepare candidates who understand the demands of learning environments;
(II) The program shall prepare candidates who understand basic classroom management theories and strategies for individuals with exceptionalities;
(III) The program shall prepare candidates who understand effective management of teaching and learning;
(IV) The program shall prepare candidates who understand teacher attitudes and behaviors that influence behavior of individuals with exceptionalities;
(V) The program shall prepare candidates who understand social skills needed for educational and other environments;
(VI) The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of strategies for crisis prevention and intervention;
(VII) The program shall prepare candidates who are aware of strategies for preparing individuals to live harmoniously and productively in a culturally diverse world;
(VIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand ways to create learning environments that allow individuals to retain and appreciate their own and each other's respective language and cultural heritage;
(IX) The program shall prepare candidates who understand ways cultures are negatively stereotyped;
(X) The program shall prepare candidates who understand strategies used by diverse populations to cope with a legacy of former and continuing racism;
(XI) The program shall prepare candidates who understand barriers to accessibility and acceptance of individuals with exceptionalities;
(XII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand adaptation of the physical environment to provide optimal learning opportunities for individuals with exceptionalities;
(XIII) The program shall prepare candidates who understand methods for ensuring individual academic success in one-to-one, small-group and large-group settings;
(XIV) The program shall prepare candidates who create a safe, equitable, positive, and supportive learning environment in which diversities are valued;
(XV) The program shall prepare candidates who identify realistic expectations for personal and social behavior in various settings;
(XVI) The program shall prepare candidates who identify supports needed for integration into various program placements;
(XVII) The program shall prepare candidates who design learning environments that encourage active participation in individual and group activities;
(XVIII) The program shall prepare candidates who modify the learning environment to manage behaviors;
(XIX) The program shall prepare candidates who use performance data and information from all stakeholders to make or suggest modifications in learning environments;
(XX) The program shall prepare candidates who establish and maintain rapport w